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Misty Valley Books
Main Street
On The Green
PO Box 700
Chester, Vermont
05143
802.875.3400


Monday-Friday
10 am - 6 pm
Saturday
10 am -5 pm
Sunday
11 am - 4 pm



 



Upcoming Events at Misty Valley Books



To be rescheduled: Joe Mazur presents his newest book, Fluke, The Math and Myth of Coincidence

What are the chances? This is the question we ask ourselves when we encounter the strangest and most seemingly impossible coincidences, like the woman who won the lottery four times or the fact that Lincoln’s dreams foreshadowed his own assassination. But, when we look at coincidences mathematically, the odds are a lot better than any of us would have thought.

In Fluke, mathematician Joseph Mazur takes a second look at the seemingly improbable, sharing with us an entertaining guide to the most surprising moments in our lives. He takes us on a tour of the mathematical concepts of probability, such as the law of large numbers and the birthday paradox, and combines these concepts with lively anecdotes of flukes from around the world. How do you explain finding your college copy of Moby Dick in a used bookstore on the Seine on your first visit to Paris? How can a jury be convinced beyond a reasonable doubt that DNA found at the scene of a heinous crime did not get there by some fluke? Should we be surprised if strangers named Maria and Francisco, seeking each other in a hotel lobby, accidentally meet the wrong Francisco and the wrong Maria, another pair of strangers also looking for each other? As Mazur reveals, if there is any likelihood that something could happen, no matter how small, it is bound to happen to someone at some time.

In Fluke, Mazur offers us proof of the inevitability of the sublime and the unexpected. He has written a book that will appeal to anyone who has ever wondered how all of the tiny decisions that happen in our lives add up to improbable wholes. A must-read for math enthusiasts and storytellers alike, Fluke helps us to understand the true nature of chance. Book signing and reception to follow. At the Bookstore. Free.

 

 


Sunday, May 22, 2016 at 4:00 PM, Long-time columnist for Yankee Magazine, Edie Clarke, will present her new book, As Simple as That: Collected Essays

Edie Clark has been writing and editing from her home in New Hampshire for the past thirty years. She has written extensively about New England in feature stories for Yankee magazine, where she served as Senior Editor for ten years and then Senior Writer and Fiction Editor for another fourteen years. Her multiple part series on topics such as land development, water pollution, the Christian Science church and the Connecticut River have gained widespread attention. In her hundreds of articles published by Yankee, she has established her reputation as one who writes about ordinary lives changed by one extraordinary act or circumstance.

At the bookstore. Reception and book signing to follow.

 

 

 

Past Events Archive


Sunday, April 10 at 4:00 PM To celebrate Poetry Month, Leland Kinsey will read from his new collection of poetry, Galvanized: New and Selected Poems

Leland Kinsey's much-anticipated new and selected poetry collection, Galvanized, ranges from Kinsey's home in the rugged mountains of northern Vermont to the towering stone lighthouses and highland shielings of his ancestors' Scotland. Drawing from seven previous, acclaimed collections, and with more than twelve new poems, Kinsey takes us with him on his travels to the brawling rivers of Labrador, the slopes of Kilimanjaro, the wheat fields and dinosaur digs of Alberta, and the ranchos of the Tex-Mex border.

With precise and original images – the Egyptian mummies used to stoke the furnaces of 19th-century steamships; the hardwood timbers of Swahili sailing freighters dating back three thousand years – Kinsey carries us deep into human history and into the natural world we were once all intimately a part of. With him, we visit the rough, country ballfields and raw girlie shows of his youth, and experience the endlessly fascinating intricacies of the work he's done, as a farrier, printer, horseman, dairy farmer, teacher. In language so exact and powerful it appears to be galvanized itself, Kinsey is a poet of the "reaches of the world," and our place in it. He writes of love and loss, of family and friendship, of joy and sorrow, always with a hard-earned vision of hope, always straight from his own dauntless heart.

At the bookstore.


 


Sunday, April 17 at 4:00 PM Former Vermont Poet Laureate Sydney Lea will read from his new book, What’s the Story? Reflections on a Life Grown Long

What’s the Story? Reflections on a Life Grown Long is, in many ways, a kaleidoscopic chronicle of Lea’s ongoing reflections about life through writing. By turns elegiac, humorous, sad, joyful, angry—and often many of these at once—this book of short prose entertains an abiding question for Lea: to what extent does his version of what happens in this life and in the world at large coincide with some putative reality? If the author had an opinionated, positive answer to such a question when young, life has imposed a degree of humility upon him in older age, whether he wants it or not. What’s the Story? is less notable, then, for the conclusions it reaches at any given point than for its compelling witness to what poet Wallace Stevens called “the mind in the act of finding what will suffice. Lea will also read selections from his poetry in honor of Poetry Month.

At the bookstore




Sunday, March 6 at 4:00 PM John McClure, owner of Baba a Louis’ Bakery, will talk about his new book, A Cancer Treatment: A Journey on the Transformation Away from Cancer- A Fictionalized Autobiographical Tale

 

John McClure is known as “the baker” in his small town of Chester, Vermont. When he was diagnosed with cancer, it was said he would not survive. As it turns out, he had his tumor resected and opted out of conventional chemotherapy and radiation, He placed his faith in an alternative oncologist who believed that through nutritional therapy, the remaining cancer cells would find a host where they were unable to flourish. McClure’s book invites readers to think differently about this disease and is a must-read for those whose lives have been touched by cancer as well as those who diagnose and treat the disease. John McClure’s recovery and survival are miraculous. He has outlived his dismal forecast by 14 years. A book signing and refreshments will follow John’s talk.

At the bookstore. Free.



 


Sunday, March 13 at 4:00 PM Ted Danforth will give a presentation with slide show of his book, The Eastern Question: A Geopolitical History in 108 Maps and Drawings

Today, headlines are dominated with news of radical militant groups in Africa and the Middle East. Their acts of terrorism seem arbitrary but they are manifestations of dynamics that have been active in the historical process from its beginning 5700 years ago. The Eastern Question presents a wealth of information about the age-old tensions and perennial conflicts that mark these regions. Here is history presented on the basis of continuing themes and moments of crisis all accompanied by original illustrations. If you want to understand the great struggle of East and West that shapes so many of our current events, read this book.

Artist and printer Danforth cleverly constructs a timeline of over 100 whimsical maps and drawings. He follows Herodotus’s ancient formulation of conflict between East (Persia) and West (Greece). Danforth moves to his timeline, slicing it into four sections, with the Ottoman Empire playing a starring role as leader of the East through 1922. Its dissolution released a spate of factions whose antagonism to the West exists in various forms to the present. his drawings convey historical conflicts more vividly than many textbooks.

CAUTION: contains Theory of History. Maybe harmful to your preconceptions. A reception and book signing will follow.

At the bookstore. Free.


 


Saturday, March 19, 2016 7:00-9:00 PM Join Misty Valley Books at the Stratton Foundation’s Taste of Vermont. We’ll be selling books by cookbook author Tracey Medeiros.

The 5th Annual “Taste of Vermont presents Restaurant Night”- a mountain favorite event where the best of southern VT restaurants, professional and amateur chefs, caterers, bakers, deli’s, and more come together in culinary camaraderie to offer their favorite recipes for the tastin. It’s a fun & satisfying event for the whole family! Tracey Medeiros is a food writer, food stylist, and recipe developer and tester. She writes "The Farmhouse Kitchen: A Guide To Eating Local" column for Edible Green Mountains Magazine. Medeiros is also the author of The Connecticut Farm Table Cookbook, The Vermont Farm Table Cookbook, and Dishing Up Vermont. She travels regionally as a guest cooking instructor sharing her commitment to the sustainable food movement while providing skillful cooking demonstrations. Tickets $40



 



Sunday, February 28 at 4:00 PM John Hadden presents the story of his father, Conversations with a Masked Man: My Father, the CIA, and Me

Son: So…the cold war was a high-stakes game you played in which it was reasonable to risk your life And to ask other people to risk theirs. For a game. Father: yes, that’s right.

“We grow up under the spell and influence of our parents, but we know so little of who they are, beyond their role as our parents. We all wonder, but most of us never ask. Conversations With A Masked Man is a beautifully written look into the frightening world of covert espionage, and a tenacious, heartfelt attempt by a son to infiltrate his father’s secrecy and silence, and find whatever common ground exists between them.”

At the bookstore.

 

 

New Voices 2016: Our 22nd Year

To honor the life of Carrol Ann Rodney Otto (1943-2015)


Saturday, January 30, 2016 at 2:00 at the Stone Church in Chester

Misty Valley Books’ annual New Voices event takes place on Saturday, January 30, 2016, at 2 pm, at the First Universalist Church in Chester’s Stone Village. The 22nd anniversary New Voices will present five promising debut authors to talk about their work. Seating is limited, however, and tickets ($10) are available at the Bookstore.

New Voices is a program which has attracted national attention, and a number of Misty Valley New Voices – including Dennis Lehane, Colum McCann, Arthur Golden, Gregory Maguire, Jennifer Egan, Alex Berenson, Heidi Durrow and Dr. Eben Alexander – have gone on to considerable fame. Over the years, New Voices has attracted thousands of loyal readers to hear well over 100 new authors read and discuss their work. The public is invited to cross country ski at Grafton Ponds ($$) with the authors, attend a wine and cheese reception (free) and dinner at The Fullerton Inn ($$) with the authors after the readings in the afternoon.

Our 22nd Anniversary New Voices 2016 featured authors are:

John Bragg, The Broom of God, A Novel of Patagonia

Patagonia. Chile. A world famous mountaineer is found murdered in basecamp near an unexplored group of mountains on the edge of the Patagonian Icecap. Inspector Juan Antonio Paz, the son of a former minister of the Allende government and the daughter of the American Naval Attache to Chile, is sent from the capital city of Santiago to investigate, an investigation that will pit him against the wild landscape of Patagonia, the tumultuous and violent political history of Chile, and the dark secrets of Puerto Verde, an isolated village. He will be tested in ways he never knew possible. Patagonia: a land of myth, of soaring granite towers, tremendous glaciers, vast lakes, of rugged beauty and hidden cruelty, and a wind so strong it is called the Broom of God. John Bragg, a renowned climber and mountaineer, fell in love with Patagonia during his first visit in 1974. He has returned again and again, exploring and climbing in both Argentina and Chile. His articles have appeared in a variety of climbing publications. He lives in New Hampshire with his wife, three dogs, two cats, and a flock of chickens.



Ron Childress, And West is West

When Jessica, a young Air Force drone pilot in Nevada, is tasked with launching a missile against a suspected terrorist halfway across the world, she realizes that though women and children are in the crosshairs of her screen, she has no choice but to follow orders. Ethan, a young Wall Street quant, is involved in a more bloodless connection to war when he develops an algorithm that enables his company’s clients to profit by exploiting the international financial instability caused by exactly this kind of antiterrorist strike. These two are only minor players, but their actions have global implications that tear lives apart--including their own. When Jessica finds herself discharged from the service and Ethan makes an error that costs him his job, both find themselves adrift, cast out by a corrupt system and forced to take the blame for decisions they did not make.

In And West Is West, Ron Childress has crafted a powerful, politically charged, and terrifyingly real scenario that takes readers into the lives of characters living in different worlds yet bound together by forces beyond their control. Winner of the prestigious PEN/Bellwether Prize for Socially Engaged Fiction, Childress worked for several years as a communications manager for a professional association near Washington, DC, before joining his wife in her tech marketing agency. In 2000, he left the business to pursue fiction writing full time.



C.W. Huntington, Jr., Maya

It is 1975 and India is in turmoil. American Stanley Harrington arrives to study Sanskrit philosophy and escape his failing marriage. When he finds himself witness to a violent accident, he begins to question his grip on reality. Maya introduces us to an entertaining cast of hippies, expats, and Indians of all walks of life. From a hermit hiding in the Himalayan jungle since the days of the British Raj, to an accountant at the Bank of India with a passion for Sanskrit poetry, to the last in a line of brahman scholars, Stanley’s path ultimately leads him to a Tibetan yogi, who enlists the American’s help in translating a mysterious ancient text. Maya, literally “illusion,” is an extended meditation on the unraveling of identity. Filled with rich observations and arresting reflections, it mines the porous border between memory and imagination. C.W. Huntington, Jr. has a Ph.D. in Buddhist Studies, and is currently Professor and Chair of Religious Studies at Hartwick College.



Jennifer Tseng, Mayumi and the Sea of Happiness

Forty-one years old, disenchanted wife and dutiful mother, Mayumi’s work as a librarian on a small island off the coast of New England feeds her passion for reading and provides her with many occasions for wry observations on human nature, but it does little to remedy the mundanity of her days. That is, until the day she issues a library card to a shy seventeen-year-old boy and swiftly succumbs to a sexual obsession that subverts the way she sees the library, her family, the island she lives on, and ultimately herself. Wary of the consequences of following through on her fantasies, Mayumi hesitates at first. But she cannot keep the young man from her thoughts. After a summer of overlong glances and nervous chitchat in the library, she finally accepts that their connection is undeniable. In a sprawling house emptied of its summer vacationers, Mayumi’s life is radically enriched by the few hours each week that she shares with the young man, and as their bond grows stronger thanks not only to their physical closeness but also to their long talks about the books they both love, those hours spent apart seem to Mayumi increasingly bleak and intolerable. As her obsession worsens, in a frantic attempt to become closer to the young man, Mayumi nervously befriends another library patron, the young man’s mother. The two women forge a tenuous friendship that will prove vital to both in the most unexpected ways when catastrophe strikes. Exquisitely written, Mayumi and the Sea of Happiness is part wry confession, part serious meditation. At its most anxious, it’s a book about time, at its most ecstatic, it’s a deeply human story about pleasure. Jennifer Tseng is the Jack Kerouac Writer-in-Residence at University of Massachusetts, Lowell.



Ed Tarkington, Only Love Can Break Your Heart

Welcome to Spencerville, Virginia, 1977. Eight-year-old Rocky worships his older brother, Paul. Sixteen and full of rebel cool, Paul spends his days cruising in his Chevy Nova blasting Neil Young, cigarette dangling from his lips, arm slung around his beautiful, troubled girlfriend. Paul is happy to have his younger brother as his sidekick. Then one day, in an act of vengeance against their father, Paul picks up Rocky from school and nearly abandons him in the woods. Afterward, Paul disappears.

Seven years later, Rocky is a teenager himself. He hasn’t forgotten being abandoned by his boyhood hero, but he’s getting over it, with the help of the wealthy neighbors’ daughter, ten years his senior, who has taken him as her lover. Unbeknownst to both of them, their affair will set in motion a course of events that rains catastrophe on both their families. After a mysterious double murder brings terror and suspicion to their small town, Rocky and his family must reckon with the past and find out how much forgiveness their hearts can hold. Ed Tarkington received a BA from Furman University, an MA from the University of Virginia, and PhD from the Graduate Creative Writing Program at Florida State. A frequent contributor to Chapter16.org, his articles, essays, and stories have appeared in Nashville Scene, Memphis Commercial Appeal, Post Road, the Pittsburgh Quarterly, the Southeast Review, and elsewhere. A native of Central Virginia, he lives in Nashville, Tennessee.

Scheduled events- All open to the public

Saturday, January 30, 2016

  • 9:30 AM: Cross country skiing/snowshoeing at Grafton Ponds Cross Country Ski Touring Center
  • 2:00 PM-4:30 PM: Readings at the Historic Stone Church in Chester (Route 103 North) with reception & book signing afterwards - Tickets $10.00
  • 6:00-8:00 PM: Wine & Cheese reception (cash bar) and dinner at The Fullerton Inn (call for reservations 802 875-2444 and price)
  • 8:00 PM: Socialize with authors in front of the fire at the inn.

 

 

Overture to Christmas. December 5 -20, 2015

Click here for details (pdf)



Vermont Voices: Four Sundays in November at
2:00 PM at The Stone Church in Chester, Vermont

Sunday, November 1, 2015 at 2:00 Nancy Marie Brown, Ivory Vikings: The Mystery of the Most Famous Chessmen in the World and the Woman Who Made Them

Chard deNiord was raised in Lynchburg, Virginia, where he attended Lynchburg College. A doctor's son, deNiord anticipated going into the medical profession as well until his college professors introduced him to religious studies, which he chose as his major. He went on to earn his MDiv from Yale Divinity School in 1978. Before pursuing ordination, deNiord got a job working as an inpatient psychiatric aide at the Connecticut Mental Health Center. He left to pursue poetry, attending the Iowa Writers' Workshop, where he received his MFA in 1985. Returning to New England, deNiord taught at private schools, including The Putney School, for over a decade while publishing his poems. In 1998, deNiord began teaching at Providence College, where he was eventually named the tenth recipient of the Joseph R. Accinno Faculty Teaching Award. That same year, he founded the Spirit and Letter Workshop, a ten-day program of workshops and lectures in Patzquaro, Mexico, featuring faculty poets such as Thomas Lux, Gerald Stern, Jean Valentine, and Ellen Bryant Voigt, among others. In 2002, deNiord cofounded the New England College MFA program in poetry, which he directed until 2007. A reception and book signing will follow deNiord's reading.

 

 

Sunday, November 8, 2015 at 2:00 Archer Mayor, The Company She Kept

Chard deNiord was raised in Lynchburg, Virginia, where he attended Lynchburg College. A doctor's son, deNiord anticipated going into the medical profession as well until his college professors introduced him to religious studies, which he chose as his major. He went on to earn his MDiv from Yale Divinity School in 1978. Before pursuing ordination, deNiord got a job working as an inpatient psychiatric aide at the Connecticut Mental Health Center. He left to pursue poetry, attending the Iowa Writers' Workshop, where he received his MFA in 1985. Returning to New England, deNiord taught at private schools, including The Putney School, for over a decade while publishing his poems. In 1998, deNiord began teaching at Providence College, where he was eventually named the tenth recipient of the Joseph R. Accinno Faculty Teaching Award. That same year, he founded the Spirit and Letter Workshop, a ten-day program of workshops and lectures in Patzquaro, Mexico, featuring faculty poets such as Thomas Lux, Gerald Stern, Jean Valentine, and Ellen Bryant Voigt, among others. In 2002, deNiord cofounded the New England College MFA program in poetry, which he directed until 2007. A reception and book signing will follow deNiord's reading.

 

 

Sunday, November 15, 2015 Greg Delanty and Tim Stevenson, Two Views of the Environmental Crisis: So Little Time and Resilience and Resistance

Chard deNiord was raised in Lynchburg, Virginia, where he attended Lynchburg College. A doctor's son, deNiord anticipated going into the medical profession as well until his college professors introduced him to religious studies, which he chose as his major. He went on to earn his MDiv from Yale Divinity School in 1978. Before pursuing ordination, deNiord got a job working as an inpatient psychiatric aide at the Connecticut Mental Health Center. He left to pursue poetry, attending the Iowa Writers' Workshop, where he received his MFA in 1985. Returning to New England, deNiord taught at private schools, including The Putney School, for over a decade while publishing his poems. In 1998, deNiord began teaching at Providence College, where he was eventually named the tenth recipient of the Joseph R. Accinno Faculty Teaching Award. That same year, he founded the Spirit and Letter Workshop, a ten-day program of workshops and lectures in Patzquaro, Mexico, featuring faculty poets such as Thomas Lux, Gerald Stern, Jean Valentine, and Ellen Bryant Voigt, among others. In 2002, deNiord cofounded the New England College MFA program in poetry, which he directed until 2007. A reception and book signing will follow deNiord's reading.

 

 

Sunday, November 22 at 2:00 Howard Frank Mosher, God’s Kingdom

Chard deNiord was raised in Lynchburg, Virginia, where he attended Lynchburg College. A doctor's son, deNiord anticipated going into the medical profession as well until his college professors introduced him to religious studies, which he chose as his major. He went on to earn his MDiv from Yale Divinity School in 1978. Before pursuing ordination, deNiord got a job working as an inpatient psychiatric aide at the Connecticut Mental Health Center. He left to pursue poetry, attending the Iowa Writers' Workshop, where he received his MFA in 1985. Returning to New England, deNiord taught at private schools, including The Putney School, for over a decade while publishing his poems. In 1998, deNiord began teaching at Providence College, where he was eventually named the tenth recipient of the Joseph R. Accinno Faculty Teaching Award. That same year, he founded the Spirit and Letter Workshop, a ten-day program of workshops and lectures in Patzquaro, Mexico, featuring faculty poets such as Thomas Lux, Gerald Stern, Jean Valentine, and Ellen Bryant Voigt, among others. In 2002, deNiord cofounded the New England College MFA program in poetry, which he directed until 2007. A reception and book signing will follow deNiord's reading.



Thursday, October 8 at 7:00 PM, poet Baron Wormser will be at Misty Valley Books as part of the Sun Dog Poetry Center’s Poets & Their Craft Lecture Series . He will speak on: “The Irony & the Ecstasy: On the Nature of Poetry and will read from his new collection of poems, UNIDENTIFIED SIGHING OBJECTS

In this collection, his 10th, Baron Wormser continues a poetic journey begun more than three decades ago—a journey that has traversed the quotidian and the unexpected with equal measures of insight, emotion, and lyric grace. He delivers his own brand of everyday realism, shaped by the wisdom gained from a lifetime viewed through an expectant eye. Man falls, Wormser tells us. But, he also rises. From sports to art, from childhood to death, Wormser’s poetic purview is all-embracing and ever curious about the world we inhabit. Whether writing of Diane Arbus or Andy Warhol, the Nuremberg trials or the fall of the Berlin Wall, jazz or the Dave Clark Five, he lends humor and wisdom to the quest for meaning each of us endures. Wormser has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, Bread Loaf, and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. From 2000 to 2006 he served as poet laureate of the state of Maine. He teaches in the Fairfield University MFA Program and is Director of Educational Outreach for the Frost Place in Franconia, New Hampshire. A reception and book signing will follow the talk.

At the bookstore. Free.



Sunday, October 11 at 4PM Vermont's new Poet Laureate, Chard deNiord reads from his new book of poetry, interstate.

Chard deNiord was raised in Lynchburg, Virginia, where he attended Lynchburg College. A doctor's son, deNiord anticipated going into the medical profession as well until his college professors introduced him to religious studies, which he chose as his major. He went on to earn his MDiv from Yale Divinity School in 1978. Before pursuing ordination, deNiord got a job working as an inpatient psychiatric aide at the Connecticut Mental Health Center. He left to pursue poetry, attending the Iowa Writers' Workshop, where he received his MFA in 1985. Returning to New England, deNiord taught at private schools, including The Putney School, for over a decade while publishing his poems. In 1998, deNiord began teaching at Providence College, where he was eventually named the tenth recipient of the Joseph R. Accinno Faculty Teaching Award. That same year, he founded the Spirit and Letter Workshop, a ten-day program of workshops and lectures in Patzquaro, Mexico, featuring faculty poets such as Thomas Lux, Gerald Stern, Jean Valentine, and Ellen Bryant Voigt, among others. In 2002, deNiord cofounded the New England College MFA program in poetry, which he directed until 2007. A reception and book signing will follow deNiord's reading.

At the bookstore.



Michael Palma Four Wednesdays: Oct 14, 21, 28, and Nov 4 at 7:00 PM The Poetry of Guido Gozzano

Once again, Professor Michael Palma returns to discuss poetry at Misty Valley Books, this time with Italian poet, Guido Gozzano (1883-1916) on four successive Wednesdays, beginning October 4 at 7:00 PM at Misty Valley Books. He will use the collection, The Colloquies and Selected Poems: The Man I Pretend to Be, translated by Michael Palma. Gozzano challenges the traditional statute of literature and creates the new authorial figure of a poet who moves out of his own poetry, looking at it with an external and ironic gaze and Palma, as always, will make him come alive. Michael Palma is an acclaimed poet and translator, an essayist, editor and critic. He lives in Bellows Falls and has done numerous talks on many poets at Misty Valley Books to enthralled audiences. The sessions are offered free of charge.

At the Bookstore, on the Green in Chester.



Sunday, September 20 at 4:00 PM Elayne Clift reads from her new collection, Children of the Chalet: New and Selected Short Stories

Clift is an award-winning writer and journalist whose work appears in a variety of publications internationally. She has published a dozen books in a variety of genres and serves as senior correspondent for the international syndicate, Women’s Feature Service. Her book, Children of the Chalet won the 2014 First Prize/Fiction Award from Greyden Press. She is a regular columnist for the Keene (NH) Sentinel and the Brattleboro (Vt.) Commons as well as a book reviewer for The Brattleboro Reformer and the New York Journal of Books and has more than 25 years of program and management experience in public health, communication, gender issues and international development. A reception and book signing will follow Ms. Clift’s remarks. At the bookstore.

Free.



Sunday, August 2 and Sunday, August 9, 7:00-8:00 PM: Professor Nicholas Daniloff will talk on Edward Snowden: Hero of Villain?

Daniloff, Professor Emeritus of Journalism at Northeastern University and former Washington and Moscow correspondent during the Cold War, will lead a talk and discussion on personal and national security, freedom of
expression, and privacy. The first session will have an introduction by Professor Daniloff followed by viewing one half of the documentary CitizenFour. The second session will include the second half of the film followed by a discussion of issues raised: Should the U.S. judicial system put Snowden on trial for espionage? Is he guilty of no more than civil
disobedience? How do we feel about surveillance, security, and privacy? What
is the price we pay for security and are we willing to do that?

Free. At the bookstore. Donations welcomed.



August 22, 2015 @ 4PM: Howard Gillette with Gus Speth & Sydney Lea discuss Gillette's new book, Class Divide, Yale '64 and the Conflicted Legacy of the Sixties

Join Howard Gilette, Professor Emeritus of History at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey with fellow Yale class of '64 members Gus Speth, Vermont Law School, and Sydney Lea, Poet Laureate of Vermont, as they discuss this important time in our nation's history.



August 23, 2015 @ 11-1:
Join Misty Valley Books and cookbook author Sarah Leah Chase at The Free Range Restaurant on the Green in Chester for brunch featuring recipes from her new cookbook, The New England Open House Cookbook. Sarah will be there to sign books and talk about her recipes.

Sarah Leah Chase began her culinary career after graduating magna cum laude from Harvard College. Having fallen in love with Nantucket during summers spent there since childhood, she became a year-round resident in 1980 and opened a specialty food shop and catering business called Que Sera Sarah. With an ever-changing array of carryout dishes inspired by the fare Sarah had savored during European travels, her shop quickly became a beloved island institution.

In a twist of fate befitting the name of her business, Sarah launched a complementary career in cookbook authoring when she met the ladies running Manhattan's Silver Palate during those early years of catering.

"I've adored Sarah Chase's cookbooks for decades! This is exactly what you want to cook at home - delicious, satisfying, earthy food your friends and family will love." - Ina Garten, Barefoot Contessa



Four Tuesdays in April at 7:00PM: A Spring Poetry Seminar with Michael Palma featuring the Poetry of Carolyn Kizer

Once again, Professor Michael Palma returns to discuss poetry at Misty Valley Books, this time with Pulitzer Prize-winner, American poet, Carolyn Kizer (1925-2014). On four Tuesday evenings, beginning April 7 at 7 pm at the Bookstore, he will introduce this poet whose verse, overtly political and bitingly satirical, came, as she fondly put it, with "a sting in the tail".

Born in Spokane to a socially prominent couple, Kizer graduated from Sarah Lawrence College, where she studied comparative mythology with Joseph Campbell. She did graduate work at Columbia and the University of Washington. She was a cofounder of the journal Poetry Northwest, which she edited. She taught literature in Pakistan, and was the first Literature Director of the National Endowment for the Arts.

Kizer, who died last year at 89, was the author of eight collections of poetry-one of which, Yin (1984), was awarded the Pulitzer Prize-as well as a book of poems in translation and two volumes of essays. Her work is notable for its vigor, wit, intellectual depth, and formal inventiveness. Its subject matter ranges from the personal, including poems on childbirth and motherhood, to the social and political. Palma's series title, Everything Is Changed, is taken from a late autobiographical poem called "Twelve O'Clock," one of her best-known and most highly regarded works.

Michael Palma is an acclaimed poet and translator, an essayist, editor and critic. He lives in Bellows Falls and has done numerous talks on many poets at Misty Valley Books to enthralled audiences.

The sessions are offered free of charge. At the Bookstore, on the Green in Chester.



 

 

 

 

 

 


Sunday, May 3, 2015 at 4:00 PM
Christopher McGrory Klyza and Stephen Trombulak present their updated edition of The Story of Vermont, a classic, contemporary account of Vermont’s environmental history.

In this second edition of their classic text, Klyza and Trombulak use the lens of interconnectedness to examine the geological, ecological, and cultural forces that came together to produce contemporary Vermont. They assess the changing landscape and its inhabitants from its pre-human evolution up to the present, with special focus on forests, open terrestrial habitats, and the aquatic environment. This edition features a new chapter covering from 1995 to 2013 and a thoroughly revised chapter on the futures of Vermont, which include discussions of Tropical Storm Irene, climate change, eco-regional planning, and the resurgence of interest in local food and energy production. Integrating key themes of ecological change into a historical narrative, this book imparts specific information about Vermont, speculates on its future, and fosters an appreciation of the complex synergy of forces that shaped this region. Book signing and reception to follow.

At the bookstore. Free


Saturday, May 2, 2015 Celebrate Independent Bookstore Day!

On May 2, 2015, independent bookstores across the country are celebrating! Stop by Misty Valley Books and let us thank you for being such great customers and friends. Special discounts, giveaways, and drawings. Local authors’ books featured and maybe an author or two.

IBD program director Samantha Schoech of California says,” “Independent Bookstore Day is a day to celebrate the tenacity and success of indie bookstores across the country and thank customers and the community of readers.

For so long, the message about indie bookstores was all doom and gloom, but the truth is, there are more indie bookstores this year than last, and more last year than the year before that. Independent bookstores are actually opening around the country. We want people to know that.” Stores across the nation and especially New England will be participating.

At the bookstore. Free


Sunday, April 19, 2015 at 4:00 PM Jeffrey Lent returns to Misty Valley to talk about his new book, A Slant of Light.

At the close of the Civil War, weary veteran Malcolm Hopeton returns to his home in western New York State to find his wife and hired man missing and his farm in disrepair. A double murder ensues, the repercussions of which ripple through a community with spiritual roots in the Second Great Awakening. Hopeton has gone from the horrors of war to those far worse, and arrayed around him are a host of other people struggling to make sense of his crime. Among them is Enoch Stone, the lawyer for the community, whose spiritual dedication is subverted by his lust for power; August Swarthout, whose wife has left earthly time and whose eye is set on eternity; and a boy who must straddle two worlds as he finds his own truth and strength.

Always there is love and the memory of love-as haunting as the American Eden that Jeffrey Lent has so exquisitely rendered in this unforgettable novel. A Slant of Light is a novel of earthly pleasure and deep love, of loss and war, of prophets and followers, of theft and revenge, in an American moment where a seemingly golden age has been shattered. This is Jeffrey Lent on his home ground and at the height of his powers. Book signing and reception to follow.

At the bookstore. Free.


Sunday, March 8, 2015 at 4:00 PM Mimi Baird and Eve Claxton, He Wanted the Moon: The Madness and Medical Genius of Dr. Perry Baird, and His Daughter's Quest to Know Him

Texas-born and Harvard-educated, Dr. Perry Baird was a rising medical star in the late 1920s and 1930s. Early in his career, ahead of his time, he grew fascinated with identifying the biochemical root of manic depression, just as he began to suffer from it himself. By the time the results of his groundbreaking experiments were published, Dr. Baird had been institutionalized multiple times, his medical license revoked, and his wife and daughters estranged. He later received a lobotomy and died from a consequent seizure, his research incomplete, his achievements unrecognized.

Mimi Baird grew up never fully knowing this story, as her family went silent about the father who had been absent for most of her childhood. Decades later, a string of extraordinary coincidences led to the recovery of a manuscript which Dr. Baird had worked on throughout his brutal institutionalization, confinement, and escape. This remarkable document, reflecting periods of both manic exhilaration and clear-headed health, presents a startling portrait of a man who was a uniquely astute observer of his own condition, struggling with a disease for which there was no cure, racing against time to unlock the key to treatment before his illness became impossible to manage.

Fifty years after being told her father would forever be “ill” and “away,” Mimi Baird set off on a quest to piece together the memoir and the man. In time her fingers became stained with the lead of the pencil he had used to write his manuscript, as she devoted herself to understanding who he was, why he disappeared, and what legacy she had inherited. The result of his extraordinary record and her journey to bring his name to light is He Wanted the Moon, an unforgettable testament to the reaches of the mind and the redeeming power of a determined heart.



New Voices 2015: Our 21st Year

Saturday, January 31, 2015 at 2:00 at the Stone Church in Chester

Now in its 21st year, Misty Valley Books continues its tradition of featuring debut authors we think show exceptional promise. New Voices is truly a community event- authors spend a weekend in beautiful Chester, Vermont skiing at Grafton Ponds Cross Country Ski Center, present their books to a capacity audience at a beautiful old stone church, and meet people from the greater Chester area (and beyond) at receptions and dinners. Each author is introduced by carefully chosen members of the community and a lively question and answer session is often the surprising highlight of the afternoon readings.

Misty Valley Books’ New Voices series has welcomed such authors as Dr. Eben Alexander (Proof of Heaven), Claire Messud (When the World was Steady, The Woman Upstairs), David Gilbert (The Normals, And Sons: A Novel), Alex Berenson (The Faithful Spy), Jennifer Egan (The Invisible Circus, A Visit from the Goon Squad), Gregory Maguire (Wicked), Colum McCann (Songdogs, Transatlantic), Deborah Kopaken Cogan (Between Here & April, Shutterbug, The Red Book), Carole DeSanti (The Unruly Passions of Eugenie R.), Dennis Lehane (A Drink Before the War, Mystic River ), and many others who have gone on to successful writing careers.

Our 21st Anniversary New Voices 2015 featured authors are:

  • Allegra Jordan, The End of Innocence
  • Tim Johnston, Descent
  • John Allen, Marmite Cowboy
  • Amy Rowland, The Transcriptionist
  • David McCullough, Jr., You are Not Special and Other Encouragements
  • Christopher Scotton, The Secret Wisdom of the Earth

Allegra Jordan
The End of Innocence


In this enthralling story of love, loss, and divided loyalties, two students, one American, one German, fall in love on the eve of World War I and must face a world at war- from opposing sides. Based on a true story behind a mysterious and controversial WWI memorial at Harvard, The End of Innocence sweeps readers from the elaborate elegance of Boston’s high society to Harvard’s halls to Belgium’s war-ravaged battlefields, offering a poignant vision of love and hope in the midst of a broken world.

 

Tim Johnston
Descent

 

Descent, the story of a family undone by the disappearance of a daughter who went out for a morning run and didn’t come back, is stunning in its emotional impact–a compulsively readable page-turner with a strong literary sensibility. The girl’s vanishing–on a sunny, late-summer vacation morning–all the more devastating for its mystery, is the beginning of the family’s harrowing journey down increasingly divergent and solitary paths, until all that continues to bind them to each other are the questions they can never bring themselves to ask: At what point does a family stop searching? At what point does a girl stop fighting for her life? Johnston captures every emotion, every terrifying thought, every moment of loneliness, from the perspectives of everyone in the family—as each in his or her own way assumes responsibility for their collective loss.

 

John Allen
Marmite Cowboy

 

From a 1960’s working class, northern English village came the Marmite Cowboy, dodging church ladies and Grebos (Greasers) while dreaming of partying on the beach with the Monkees. To New York City and beyond he went, through the excesses of the 70’s and 80’s following the trail of an American-wannabe lad, ending up as manager of The Iron Horse in Northampton, Mass.(where he welcomed such acts as The Marvelettes and Wilson Pickett) and playing with his rock band, Big Bad Bullocks for the past twenty years, touring northeastern US and England. Told with humor and a fair amount of grim detail, Marmite Cowboy traces, in a startling memoir, the fantasies realities, and challenges of the unpredictable world of the wanderer.

 

Amy Rowland
The Transcriptionist

 

This powerful debut follows a woman who sets out to challenge the absurdity of the world around her. Lena, the transcriptionist, sits alone in a room far away from the hum of the newsroom that is the heart of the Record, the New York City newspaper for which she works. For years, she has been the ever-present link for reporters calling in stories from around the world. She is loyal, she is unquestioning, yet technology is dictating that her days there are numbered. When she reads a shocking piece in the paper about a Jane Doe mauled to death by a lion, she recognizes the woman in the picture. They had met on a bus just a few days before. Obsessed with understanding what caused the woman to deliberately climb into the lion's den, Lena begins a campaign for truth that will destroy the Record's complacency and shake the venerable institution to its very foundation. An exquisite novel that asks probing questions about journalism and ethics, about the decline of the newspaper and the failure of language, it is also the story of a woman's effort to establish her place in an increasingly alien and alienating world (Goodreads).

 

David McCullough, Jr.
You are Not Special and
Other Encouragements

 

In You Are (Not) Special, McCullough elaborates on his now-famous speech exploring how, for what purpose, and for whose sake, we're raising our kids. With wry, affectionate humor, McCullough takes on hovering parents, ineffectual schools, professional college prep, electronic distractions, club sports, and generally the manifestations, and the applications and consequences of privilege. By acknowledging that the world is indifferent to them, McCullough takes pressure off of students to be extraordinary achievers and instead exhorts them to roll up their sleeves and do something useful with their advantages.

 

Christopher Scotton
The Secret Wisdom
of the Earth

After witnessing the death of his younger brother in a terrible accident, 14-year-old Kevin and his grieving mother are sent for the summer to live with Kevin’s grandfather. In the peeled-paint coal town of Medgar, Kentucky, deep in Appalachia, Kevin quickly falls in with a half-wild hollow kid named Buzzy Fink who schools him in the mysteries and magnificence of the woods. During this fateful summer, Medgar is beset by a massive Mountaintop Removal operation that is blowing up the hills and back filling the hollows. Kevin’s grandfather and others in town attempt to rally the citizens against the ‘company’ and its powerful owner to stop the plunder of their mountain heritage. When Buzzy witnesses the brutal murder of the opposition leader, a sequence is set in play which tests Buzzy and Kevin to their absolute limits in an epic struggle for survival in the Kentucky mountains. Redemptive and emotionally resonant, The Secret Wisdom of the Earth is narrated by an adult protagonist looking back on the summer when he sloughed the coverings of a boy and took his first faltering steps to manhood. It is a novel that challenges the reader to consider the complicated economic choices facing the rural poor.

Scheduled events- All open to the public

Saturday, January 31, 2015

  • 9:30 AM:
    Cross country skiing/snowshoeing at Grafton Ponds Cross Country Ski Touring Center
  • 2:00 PM-4:30 PM
    Readings at the Historic Stone Church in Chester (Route 103 North) with reception & book signing afterwards Tickets $10.00
  • 6:00-8:00 PM
    Wine & Cheese reception (cash bar) and dinner at The Fullerton Inn (call for reservations 802 875-2444 and price)
  • 8:00 PM
    Socialize with authors in front of the fire at the inn.


Vermont Voices: Sundays in November at 2:00 at the Stone Church in Chester

November 2, 2014 Thomas Christopher Greene,
The Headmaster’s Wife

Inspired by a personal loss, Greene explores the way that tragedy and time assail one man’s memories of his life and loves. Like his father before him, Arthur Winthrop is the Headmaster of Vermont’s elite Lancaster School. It is the place he feels has given him his life, but is also the site of his undoing as events spiral out of his control. Found wandering naked in Central Park, he begins to tell his story to the police, but his memories collide into one another, and the true nature of things, a narrative of love, of marriage, of family and of a tragedy. Greene was a Misty Valley Books’ New Voice in 2004 with his novel, Mirror Lake. The Headmaster’s Wife is his fourth novel. He has worked as an oyster shucker, as deputy press secretary for a presidential campaign, has been a professor of writing and literature, and is the founding president of Vermont College of Fine Arts in Montpelier.

November 9, 2014 Archer Mayor, Proof Positive,
The 25th Joe Gunther mystery

In Proof Positive, Archer Mayor’s 25 Joe Gunther mystery, Joe and his team leave their standard New England bailiwick for Philadelphia. Two bodies are found in a hoarder’s Vermont home; one victim has a Philly rap sheet and may have played a role in the hoarder's demise. Another body turns up in the City of Brotherly Love. Mayor’s research for Proof Positive took him sniffing around Philadelphia Police Department headquarters and Port Richmond, delving into historical data, interviewing locals, and photographing neighborhoods across Philadelphia to get a feel for the city. Fans will not be disappointed!

 

November 16, 2014 Stephen P. Kiernan,
The Curiosity

Dr. Kate Philo and her scientific expedition team make a breathtaking discovery in the Arctic: the body of a man buried deep in ice. The project is run by the egocentric Erastus Carthage who, heedless of the consequences, orders that the frozen man be brought back to the lab in Boston, and reanimated. As the man begins to regain his memories, the team learns that he was – is – a judge, Jeremiah Rice, and the last thing he remembers is falling overboard into the Arctic Ocean in 1906. When news of the project and Jeremiah Rice’s awakening breaks, it ignites a media firestorm and massive protests by religious fundamentalists. Thrown together by circumstances beyond their control, Kate and Jeremiah grow closer. But the clock is ticking and his new life is slipping away. With Carthage planning to exploit Jeremiah while he can, Kate must decide how far she is willing to go to protect the man she has come to love. Kiernan has taught at Middlebury College and the New England Young Writers Conference, and has worked on the staff of the Breadloaf School of English and the Breadloaf Writers Conference. He chairs the board of the Young Writers Project, served on the Vermont Legislative Committee on Pain and Palliative Care, and joined the advisory board of the New Hampshire Palliative Care Initiative. He is also the author of two non fiction books, Last Rights and Authentic Patriotism.

November 23, 2014 Governor Jim Douglas,
The Vermont Way

Jim Douglas was first elected to the Vermont House in 1972, just months after graduating from Middlebury College. He was re-elected three more times and rose to Majority Leader before leaving to join the senior staff of Governor Snelling. Douglas was then elected Secretary of State, where he served for twelve years. In 1994, Douglas became State Treasurer, and was re-elected three times. In 2002, he was elected to the first of four terms as Vermont’s 80th governor. Douglas became a true insider, with an encyclopedic knowledge of the people and practices of government. But his real legacy grows from his unflagging commitment to get out of Montpelier and meet Vermonters one-on-one in the places they lived, worked, studied, and played. He took this intimate knowledge of Vermonters’ hopes and needs to craft the policies and programs that earned him more votes than any other politician in Vermont history. The Vermont Way includes forty-one photographs that bring history to life, creating a portrait of Jim Douglas and the state of Vermont. Douglas does it all: kissing a cow at a county fair, chatting with kids at their lemonade stand on the campaign trail, visiting Vermont National Guard troops in the Middle East, and offering advice to the president in the Oval Office. A great book for lovers of Vermont and Vermont history.


Sunday, October 5 at 4:00 PM Naturalist & educator Lynn Levine returns to Misty Valley Books to discuss and demonstrate from her new book, A New Method of Tracking. At the store


Sunday, August 24 at 4:00 Matt Carroll, formerly of Londonderry, VT presents his fictionalized memoir, Who Quinn Became

Carroll’s book is the story of Quinn, an only child, orphaned by tragic deaths and taken in by an aunt and uncle with nine children. The specter of his father's passing haunts his life as he attempts to bury him forever while at the same time seeking him in look-alike strangers on Manhattan sidewalks. His life takes him from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, to the most remote parts of the Sahara Desert, into a one-room Vermont schoolhouse, and the mountains of Mexico. An often sad but ever amusing story of romances, occupations, adventures, race-car euphoria, and despair, Carroll will take you along for the ride.. Vermonters will remember him as principal of Flood Brook School and proprietor of The West Bank in South Londonderry. He now lives in Mexico.

Reception and book signing to follow.




Sunday, August 3, 2014 at 4:00 PM - Adam R. Boyce tells the remarkable story of Charles Ross Taggart, The Old Country Fiddler: The Man From Vermont

In 1895, East Topsham’s Charles Ross Taggart set his sights on becoming a traveling musical humorist. His uproarious ventriloquist and musical performances brought rave reviews in his Vermont community. He was soon thrust into the world of the lyceum and Chautauqua circuits, journeying far and wide across North America.

His forty-three year career spanned some of America’s most exciting and most difficult times, and his folk performances—especially his beloved “Old Country Fiddler—brought smiles to all who experienced them. He was also an innovator in the entertainment industry, recording his music and humor, as well as appearing in one of the first “talkie” films.

Discover the remarkable story of The Man from Vermont, who helped Americans forget their troubles when they needed it most with his mimicry, stories and fiddling. Long -time Vermonter Boyce, is a recognized authority on fiddling and calling for square and contra dances and was the 2000 Vermont division winner of the former Northeast Fiddlers’ Contest in Barre, Vermont. He is a partner on special projects with the Vermont Folk Life Center in Middlebury and performs a living history portrayal of Charles Ross Taggart for non-profits in Vermont and New Hampshire. He lives in West Windsor, Vermont.

A reception (and maybe some fiddling) and book signing will follow his talk. At the bookstore. Free.



A NEW COLD WAR? PROFESSOR NICK DANILOFF TO SPEAK ON THE POSSIBILITY AT MISTY VALLEY LECTURES

Four Tuesdays in July- July 1, 8, 15, and 22 at 7:00 PM

Are we entering a new Cold War in our relations with Russia? Nick Daniloff, newly retired Northeastern University professor and Andover resident, will be at Misty Valley Books, on the Green in Chester, on four Tuesdays in July to talk about the situation in Russia and Ukraine. The lectures/discussions will be at 7 pm.

Daniloff has been Professor of Journalism at Northeastern for the last 25 years. Prior to that, he spent his journalism career covering the Cold War from Washington and Moscow from 1961-1986.

In 1986, at the end of his assignment for U.S. News & World Report, he was arrested by the KGB and accused of spying in the last “tit for tats” of the Cold War, occasioned by the arrest in New York by the FBI of a Soviet physicist, Gennady Zakharov. Daniloff is the author of The Kremlin and the Cosmos (1972), Two Lives, One Russia (1988) and Of Spies and Spokesmen: My Life as a Cold War Correspondent (2008). Daniloff’s Misty Valley Books series will consider the causes of the “old” Cold War, the nature of U.S. – Soviet tensions, espionage, and how the “new” Cold War may have similarities but also some very different challenges for Russia and global relations.

The series is free and open to the public, although a free will offering will support the Bookstore’s programs.


Tosca: A Chester Opera Prelude at Misty Valley Books

The Windham Orchestra and PanOpera, in collaboration with Misty Valley Books, will present a four-week course beginning April 17 called Tosca: A Chester Prelude.

The course, to be held at the bookstore, will consider the history, settings, language, music, composition, and human drama of Giacomo Puccini's opera and will culminate in a live performance of selections from Tosca at the Stone Church in Chester on Sunday, May 11, at 3 p.m.

The course, which will meet on four consecutive Thursdays at 7-9 pm, will be led by Dr. Luci Fortunato, retired professor of Italian History who has taught and done research in Puccini's hometown of Lucca, and by Hugh Keelan, conductor of PanOpera and the Windham Orchestra.

A full semi-staged production of Tosca will be given in Brattleboro at the Latchis Theater on May 30, at 7:30 p.m. and on June 1 at 3:00 pm, as well as in Northampton at the Academy of Music on June 5 at 7:30 p.m.

The Windham Orchestra and PanOpera will be joined by international opera star and Chester resident Stan Norsworthy, who sings the role of Scarpia.

In Tosca, there are no gods or mythical figures standing before us but rather raw humanity on display. The opera tells the brutal truth about what drives us. It is essential Puccini, an ultimate work of verismo: lurid, ravishing and hugely enjoyable.

To enroll in the Tosca course, please call Misty Valley Books at (802) 875-3400. A freewill donation will be requested at each class.



April 16 - May 7 at 7:00 PM Michael Palma, returning to Misty Valley Books, will consider the poetry of Wallace Stevens and William Carlos Williams on four Wednesday evenings.

Sunday, March 30 at 4:00 PM Nick San Martino presents his book, Conquering the Beast: Thirty Years with the Boston Marathon.

Nicholas San Martino is a physical therapist who has run and completed the Boston Marathon thirty times. He will talk about that feat and present his new book, Conquering the Beast: Thirty Years with the Boston Marathon, which takes the reader to the heart of the Boston Marathon experience and defines what it means to both runners and the community. In the book, San Martino gives helpful strategies such as the “Ten Commandments of Boston”, how to make your own energy drink, and what to eat the night before and day of the race. He includes the unique and colorful history of this world-renowned competition - and speaks of the dreadful bombings last year. San Martino was there.Nicolas San Martino also competed in the Ironman Triathlon in 1983. He was a physical therapist in Springfield, VT, a track coach in Milford, NH, and is a graduate of the University of Vermont. He is father of five, has one grandchild, and continues to run at age 58. A book signing and reception will follow San Martino’s presentation. Free.



Sunday, April 27, 2014 at 4:00 PM Poet Leland Kinsey reads from his 7th collection of poetry, Winter Ready.

After a getaway in gorgeous rural Vermont—its mountains ablaze in autumnal glory, its Main Streets quaint and welcoming—Ellen Stimson and her family make up their minds even before they get back to St. Louis: “We’re moving to Vermont!”

Leland Kinsey is also the author of six collections of poetry, including In the Rain Shadow, Sledding on Hospital Hill, and, The Immigrant’s Contract. He has worked as a farmhand, printer, horse trainer, maple sugar maker, and Elderhostel instructor in writing, birding, astronomy, and canoeing. He lives in Vermont near the Canadian border with his wife and three children..

At the bookstore. Reception and book signing to follow.


Sunday, April 27 at 4:00 PM Poet Lee Bramble (aka Tom Ragle) reads from his new collection of poetry, Take This Song, Poems in Pursuit of Meaning

Lee Bramble is the pen name of Tom Ragle. Ragle served as a teacher of English literature, with a focus on classical British and American poetry, and was president of Marlboro College from 1958 to 1981. He was instrumental in the creation of the college’s distinguished Kipling collection, has been director of the Salzburg Seminar (1983-89), and was special consultant to the United Nations Development Program in Beijing, China, on the teaching of English literature at the university level (1989-91). He lives in Guilford, Vermont in the 1780 farmhouse in which his wife and their children were raised. He is the author of Take This Song, Poems in Pursuit of Meaning).



Sunday, March 9, 2014 at 4:00
Ellen Stimson presents Mud Season, a true story!

After a getaway in gorgeous rural Vermont—its mountains ablaze in autumnal glory, its Main Streets quaint and welcoming—Ellen Stimson and her family make up their minds even before they get back to St. Louis: “We’re moving to Vermont!”

The reality, they quickly learn, is a little muddier than they’d imagined, but, happily, worth all the trouble.

In self-deprecating and hilarious fashion, Mud Season chronicles Stimson’s transition from city life to rickety Vermont farmhouse.

When she decides she wants to own and operate the old-fashioned village store in idyllic Dorset, pop. 2,036, one of the oldest continually operating country stores in the country, she learns the hard way that “improvements” are not always welcomed warmly by folks who like things just fine the way they’d always been.

At the bookstore. Reception and book signing to follow.


Sunday, February 9, 2014 at 4:00 PM
Poetry in the Afternoon

Pat Fargnoli

Rick Bates

Tim Mayo

Jim Fowler

Featuring former poet laureate of New Hampshire, Pat Fargnoli, Rick Bates, Tim Mayo, and Jim Fowler, reading from their latest works.

At the bookstore. Reception and book signing.

 

 

 

February 1, 2014 at Stratton Mountain Resort Base Lodge, Taste of Vermont 2014

Enjoy tastings of the finest food prepared, donated & served to you by our area’s Best Restaurants, Professional & Amateur Chefs. Misty Valley Books will be there selling books! www.strattonfoundation.org

$100 Premier Pass

6:45-7:15 PM - Early Tasting Meet & Greet Tracey Medeiros, Vermont Cookbook Author & Food Writer Receive Tracey's 'Dishing up Vermont' or 'The Vermont Farm Table Cookbook' Tracey's Cooking Demo of Sauteed Sea Scallops in a Smoked Bacon and Maple Cream Sauce 2-complimentry wine or beer

or

$50 ADULTS $20 CHILDREN UNDER 13 All non-alcoholic beverages included Beer & Wine Available

 

February 2, 2014 at 2:00 PM
Civil War historian Howard Coffin talks about his new book, Something Abides

Something Abides is an amazing guidebook that takes the reader to every town in Vermont and brings the Civil War alive. Coffin researched surviving sites in all of Vermont's 251 towns and cities including homes of Civil War soldiers, hospitals, drill fields, cemeteries, halls where abolitionists spoke and war meetings were held, monuments, homes where women met to sew for the soldiers, factories that made war materials, war resistors' homes, Underground Railroad sites, and more. James McPherson, Pulitzer Prize-winning Civil War historian, in his foreward to the book, says, "In his writing, Howard Coffin has taken us to Gettysburg and the Wilderness and Cedar Creek and Petersburg and other fields where Vermonters fought and died. And now he takes us to hundreds of places in Vermont where these soldiers came from and where their families and friends worked to support them and hoped, often in vain, that they would return home safely.

Something Abides took six years and 150,000 miles of travel to compile. The result is commensurate with the effort. It is a tour de force." A reception and book signing will follow Coffin's talk.

Free. At the store.


New Voices 2014
Saturday, January 25, 2014 at 2:00 PM

at The Stone Church in Chester, Vermont

Bill Dakin addressing the crowd

Now in its 20th year, Misty Valley Books continues its tradition of featuring debut authors we think show exceptional promise. New Voices is truly a community event- authors spend a weekend in beautiful Chester, Vermont skiing at Grafton Ponds Cross Country Ski Center, present their books to a capacity audience at a beautiful old stone church, and meet people from the greater Chester area (and beyond) at receptions and dinners. Each author is introduced by carefully chosen members of the community and a lively question and answer session is often the surprising highlight of the afterrnoon readings.

Misty Valley Books’ New Voices series has welcomed such authors as Dr. Eben Alexander (Proof of Heaven), Claire Messud (When the World was Steady, The Woman Upstairs), David Gilbert (The Normals, And Sons: A Novel), Alex Berenson (The Faithful Spy), Jennifer Egan (The Invisible Circus, A Visit from the Goon Squad), Gregory Maguire (Wicked), Colum McCann (Songdogs, Transatlantic), Deborah Kopaken Cogan (Between Here & April, Shutterbug, The Red Book), Carole DeSanti (The Unruly Passions of Eugenie R.), Dennis Lehane (A Drink Before the War, Mystic River ), and many others who have gone on to successful writing careers.

Our 20th Anniversary New Voices 2014 featured authors are:

  • Rebecca Walker, Ade (New Harvest Press)
  • Elaine Neil Orr, A Different Sun (Berkley/Penguin)
  • Shahan Mufti, The Faithful Scribe (Other Press)
  • Rhonda Riley, The Enchanted Life of Adam Hope (HarperCollins)
  • Peter Swanson, The Girl With a Clock for a Heart ( William Morrow)

Shahan Mufti:

Shahan Mufti's family history, which he can trace back 1,400 years to the inner circle of the prophet Muhammad, offers an engrossing perspective on the frequently mystifying history of Pakistan. Mufti uses the stories of his ancestors, many of whom served as judges and jurists in Muslim Sharia courts of South Asia for many centuries, to reveal the deepest roots - real and imagined - of Islamic civilization in Pakistan. More than a personal history, The Faithful Scribe captures the larger story of the world's first Islamic democracy, and explains how the state that once promised to bridge Islam and the west is now threatening to crumble under historical and political pressure and why Pakistan's destiny matters to us all. Shahan Mufti lives with his wife in Richmond, Virginia, where he is an assistant professor of journalism at the University of Richmond.


Rebecca Walker:

Known for her brilliant, frank memoirs, Rebecca Walker returns with Adé, a poetic, lushly written debut exploring the themes of memory, longing, passion, and loss- the story of a free-spirited American woman and a Swahili Muslim man who fall in love on the exquisite island of Lamu, off the coast of Kenya. There, they create their own paradise- living in a traditional small white house and creating their private language of intimacy. After an intense courtship, Adé asks for Farida’s hand in marriage. But when Adé and Farida are forced to leave the island in preparation for their wedding, Farida is faced by the unsettling and often violent realities of life on the mainland. And just as the Persian Gulf War begins, Farida succumbs to a disease that almost kills her, and alters her relationship with Adé forever. A transcendent love story turned tale of survival, Adé explores what happens when one couple’s private idyll is interrupted by a world in the throes of massive upheaval. Rebecca Walker is the author of critically acclaimed memoirs, including Black, White, and Jewish and Baby Love: Choosing Motherhood After a Lifetime of Ambivalence. Ade is her first novel.


Elaine Neil Orr:

“Here am I, send me. The prophet Isaiah’s words echo through Emma Davis’s mind as she faces the emptiness of her days as a plantation owner’s daughter. The handsome and passionate preacher visiting her backwoods Georgia community in 1840 speaks of bringing light into the darkness of Africa. Smitten with Pastor Henry Bowman and thirsty for the new life he speaks of, Emma marries Henry and joins him at a new mission post in Lagos. Uncle Eli, who has been a slave on her father’s plantation Emma’s entire life, gives her a simple gift before she leaves, which takes on fresh meaning during the journey across the African continent. Lush, evocative, breathtaking in its descriptions, and deeply spiritual in its themes of love, forgiveness, and transformation, this extraordinary novel shines with light and depth. Reminiscent of Barbara Kingsolver’s magnum opus, The Poisonwood Bible, with elements of Joseph Conrad and Louise Erdrich, Orr’s stunning debut is starkly beautiful and true to life”, writes Julia M. Reffner. Elaine Neil Orr was born in Nigeria in 1954. Her parents were medical missionaries. She attended ninth grade at Decatur High School from 1968-69, when her parents, Southern Baptists, were on furlough. In 1997, failing health — she needed kidney and pancreas transplants — pushed her to write her memoir which describes growing up in Nigeria interspersed with tales of her medical treatment. Writing about the land of her birth as she was being treated, she said, helped her heal. She is now a professor of contemporary literature and women’s studies at North Carolina State University.


Rhonda Riley:

The story of Adam Hope begins as WWII ends. Evelyn Roe finds what she thinks is a badly injured soldier on her family’s farm in rural North Carolina and literally unearths him. But she quickly discovers he is a very unique stranger, not a man, and not one of us. Vastly different from Evelyn, he is also capable of being almost identical to her. The Enchanted Life of Adam Hope is about being the other, about loving others, and accepting what we cannot understand. The heart of this book is the moment we look at someone we love and have known for a long time—a friend, a parent, lover, spouse or child—and think “Who are you?” The question can be one of amazement and delight or a dark panic. How do we love someone we cannot understand or fully know? “Rhonda Riley’s debut novel fuses a lyrical, tender love story with a sophisticated depiction of a supernatural sentient being… [Riley] succeeds both in getting the reader to suspend disbelief and fashioning a compelling story.”
—Publishers Weekly. Rhonda Riley lives in Gainesville, Florida.


Peter Swanson:

On an ordinary Friday evening at his favorite Boston tavern, George Foss’s comfortable, predictable life is shattered when a beautiful woman sits down at the bar, the same woman who vanished without a trace twenty years ago. Liana Dector isn’t just an ex-girlfriend, the first love George couldn’t forget. She’s also a dangerous enigma and possibly a cold-blooded killer wanted by the police. Suddenly, she’s back—and she needs George’s help. Ruthless men believe she stole some money . . . and will do whatever it takes to get it back. Former New Voice and New York Times bestselling author Dennis Lehane writes, ”What do you say when a woman who broke your heart years ago and is wanted for questioning in connection to a murder pops back into your life to ask a favor? If she’s as alluring as Liana Dector, you say, ‘Yes.’ And hope you survive . . . The Girl with a Clock for a Heart is a twisty, sexy, electric thrill ride.”


Scheduled events- All open to the public

Saturday, January 25, 2014

  • 9:00 AM:
    Cross country skiing/snowshoeing at Grafton Ponds Cross Country Ski Touring Center
  • 2:00 PM-5:00 PM
    Readings at the Historic Stone Church in Chester (Route 103 North) with reception & book signing afterwards Tickets $10.00
  • 6:00-8:00 PM
    Wine & Cheese reception (cash bar) and dinner at The Fullerton Inn (call for reservations 802 875-2444 and price)
  • 8:00 PM
    Socialize with authors in front of the fire at the inn.
  •  

Save the dates: Vermont Voices: Four Sundays in November at 2:00 at the Stone Church in Chester

Sunday, November 3 Archer Mayor discusses his latest Joe Gunther book, Three Can Keep a Secret

Archer's 24th Joe Gunther mystery has Joe and his team working to solve a complex case involving two corpses, one escaped mental patient, and a long-held secret that binds them together - all set during Hurricane Irene's devastating tear through Vermont in 2011. Reception and book signing to follow. Free.

 

Sunday, November 10 Photographer Peter Miller presents his newest book, A Lifetime of Vermont People

In this newest work by Vermont's most distinguished photographer, Peter Miller brings together some of his most iconic photographs from the first editions of Vermont People (1991) and Vermont Farm Woman (2002) with over 50 new photographs of Vermonters and their stories, capturing the essential character of the people of Vermont since 1950.Discussion and slide show. A reception and book signing will follow Peter's talk. Free.

 

Sunday, November 17 Civil War historian Howard Coffin talks about his new book, Something Abides

POSTPONED

Something Abides is an amazing guidebook that takes the reader to every town in Vermont and brings the Civil War alive. Coffin researched surviving sites in all of Vermont's 251 towns and cities including homes of Civil War soldiers, hospitals, drill fields, cemeteries, halls where abolitionists spoke and war meetings were held, monuments, homes where women met to sew for the soldiers, factories that made war materials, war resistors' homes, Underground Railroad sites, and more. James McPherson, Pulitzer Prize-winning Civil War historian, in his foreward to the book, says, "In his writing, Howard Coffin has taken us to Gettysburg and the Wilderness and Cedar Creek and Petersburg and other fields where Vermonters fought and died. And now he takes us to hundreds of places in Vermont where these soldiers came from and where their families and friends worked to support them and hoped, often in vain, that they would return home safely.

Something Abides took six years and 150,000 miles of travel to compile. The result is commensurate with the effort. It is a tour de force." A reception and book signing will follow Coffin's talk. Free.

 

Sunday, November 24 Honorary Vermonter Jon Katz presents his new book, The Second Chance Dog: A Love Story

New York Times bestselling author Jon Katz (and honorary Vermonter) returns with the long-awaited story of his nearly untameable dog, Frieda. After moving to a dilapidated farm in upstate New York, divorcing, suffering a breakdown, and renouncing almost everything from his previous life, Jon Katz meets a woman and a dog who will change him forever. The woman is Maria Wulf, a sensitive artist, and the dog is Frieda, a half Rottweiler/half
Shepherd former junkyard dog and Maria's staunch protector and only friend. Maria will eventually become Jon's second chance at happiness. Frieda is ready to tear Jon to pieces. But armed with a lifetime of knowledge about dogs and 500 pounds of beef jerky, he is ready for the challenge. To win Maria's heart, Jon will first have to win over Frieda. A reception and book signing will follow Jon's talk. Free.

 

Michael Palma, Four Wednesdays: September 25, October 2, 9, and 16 from 7:00-8:00 PM

Michael Palma presents his fall poetry seminar on poets Daniel Hoffman, Edgar Allan Poe, and Stephen Crane.

The series is intended as a celebration of the life and work of an outstanding American poet and critic, Daniel Hoffman, who died in April of this year just days before his ninetieth birthday. The first of his many collections, An Armada of Thirty Whales (1954), was selected by W. H. Auden for the prestigious Yale Series of Younger Poets. In the 1970s, Hoffman served as Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress, the position now known as Poet Laureate of the United States. As part of the tribute to his achievements, there will also be discussions of the poetry of two classic American writers, Edgar Allan Poe and Stephen Crane, who were the subjects of definitive book-length studies by Hoffman.

Best known as the author of superb horror stories and as the creator of the detective story, Poe (1809-1849) is also renowned for such poems as "To Helen," "Annabel Lee," and "The Raven". Widely admired for his Civil War novel The Red Badge of Courage, Crane (1871-1900) published two volumes of striking and often bitter free-verse poems in the 1890s. The discussions will conclude with a consideration of the poetry of Daniel Hoffman himself, who continued to produce first-rate work almost to the very end of his life.

To register, call 875-3400.


Rick Stromoski - October 20

Rick Stromoski, cartoonist and author of the syndicated comic strip, Soup to Nutz, will be at Misty Valley Books on Sunday, October 20, 2013 at 4:00 PM to talk about his book, A Second Helping. Stromoski has illustrated for Scholastic, Parent’s Magazine, McGraw Hill, and many other well known publishers. His cartoon strip appears nationally.

The Nutz family is definitely not the Cleavers, the Waltons or the Bradys. But you'll undoubtedly recognize them anyway. Most likely, they're a lot like the family you grew up in. Where the oldest boy Royboy when not torturing his younger brother, digs up deceased pet turtles weeks after their backyard funerals, middle child Babs advocates for veganism and solutions to global warming, and youngest brother Andrew would rather wear a tutu than a football helmet and prefer Barbies over GI Joe. Soup to Nutz is a family comic strip unlike most family comic strips.

Rick will show how he creates a cartoon and will do some interactive cartooning with the audience. Bring your whole family for a fascinating and funny afternoon.

Rick lives in the historic district of Suffield, Connecticut with his wife, Danna, and daughter, Molly, along with their dog, Rascal, and fighting cats. They also spend a lot of time at their cabin in Windham, VT near Tater Hill.

A reception and book signing will follow his talk.


Sunday, August 25, 2013 at 4:00 PM ~ Acclaimed author, Howard Norman, talks about his recent memoir, I Hate to Leave this Beautiful Place

Norman’s story begins with a portrait, both harrowing and hilarious, of a Midwest boyhood summer working in a bookmobile, in the shadow of a grifter father and under the erotic tutelage of his brother’s girlfriend. His life story continues in places as far-flung as the Arctic, where he spends part of a decade as a translator of Inuit tales—including the story of a soapstone carver turned into a goose whose migration-time lament is “I hate to leave this beautiful place”—and in his beloved Point Reyes, California, as a student of birds. In the Arctic, he receives news over the radio that “John Lennon was murdered tonight in the city of New York in the USA.” And years later, in Washington, D.C., another act of deeply felt violence occurs in the form of a murder-suicide when Norman and his wife loan their home to a poet and her young son. Norman’s story is also stitched together with moments of uncanny solace. Of life in his Vermont farmhouse Norman writes, “Everything I love most happens most every day.”

Author of The Northern Lights, The Bird Artist, What is Left the Daughter, and many other novels, Norman teaches at the University of Maryland and spends wonderful hours in his Vermont farmhouse- one of his beautiful places he hates to leave.

At the bookstore. A reception and book signing will follow.


Chester Summer Concert Series

Chester’s 2013 Summer Concert Series returns to the Academy Building lawn in downtown Chester with five Thursday night concerts from 6:30-8:00 pm starting July 11, 2013.

Kicking off the series on July 11 is an area favorite- Gypsy Reel- music rooted in the Celtic tradition but garnered from the whole world - followed by a return performance of The Starline Rhythm Boys with their classic country and vintage rock ‘n roll on July 18th. New this year is Big Spike who has been making waves on the bluegrass circuit since 2001.He and his band will be here on July 25th . On August 1st Gerry Grimo and the East Bay Jazz Ensemble will play not only the great big band sounds, but also favorites from Motown, Swing, Oldies, Classic Rock, Latin, and Ballroom. And to wrap up this year’s concert series, on August 8th , Chester’s own Chris Kleeman and his band will perform old, traditional and Chicago blues style music along with some of Chris’own tunes. Bring your blankets and lawn chairs and be prepared to sit back and listen to great music on a summer night right in downtown Chester. In case of inclement weather, concerts will move to The Stone Hearth Inn on Route 11 West. All concerts are free. The concerts are brought to you by generous local sponsors and the Rotary Club of Chester, VT. For more information contact 875-3400.




Sunday, July 28, 2013 at 4:00PM Sue Halpern, A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home

In A DOG WALKS INTO A NURSING HOME: Lessons in the Good Life from an Unlikely Teacher, Halpern uses her extensive knowledge and varied background, which includes a doctorate from Oxford and work in prisons and hospitals, to write about her dog, Pransky’s and her experiences as a therapy dog team who find unexpected meaning—and pleasure—volunteering in a public nursing home. With the charm of John Grogan’s Marly and Me and the thoughtfulness of Temple Grandin’s Animals Make Us Human, Halpern brings audiences a new and delightfully different kind of dog book that derives lessons in the good life from a colorful cast of wheelchair-bound nonagenarians.

"With each chapter framed around one of the seven classic virtues—restraint, prudence, faith, fortitude, hope, love, and charity—A DOG WALKS INTO A NURSING HOME is not only a book for dog-lovers, but a book for anyone looking to live a full and happy life. “A book about a dog that is ultimately a book about humanity… a beautiful, honest, joyful accounting of what matters.”

—Terry Tempest Williams, author of Refuge and When Women Were Birds



Sunday, July 21, 2013 at 4:00 PM David Chase, Grants Ferry

Following a thirty year absence, Kenneth Forbes is summoned back to his home town, Grants Ferry, Vermont, to settle his recently deceased Aunt Fanny's estate. Still furious at his escape all those years ago, Fanny takes elaborate revenge through her will. Kenneth inherits her considerable holdings but with strict criteria and a challenge that risks everything if he fails. The alternative to failure or simply walking away, at least in Kenneth's mind, is even worse. Add the people Kenneth left behind when he ran away, the steady decay of the town itself, and what Kenneth views as provincial simplicity of the generation now in charge, and Kenneth finds himself soundly ensnared in Fanny's trap. Grants Ferry's history is long and peppered with local characters, often a touch eccentric, who create a pleasant mix of humor, cruelty, tenderness, and violence. Arlo Mudgett says,” Grants Ferry is about the people of a small Vermont town that is in the Connecticut River Valley, just north of Springfield, and south of Windsor, all the while not being Weathersfield or Ascutney in any way. I've read any number of books set in Vermont, but I have to say that there's nothing quite like the perspective of a native Vermonter to get it right. David accurately portrays the tight fisted fiscal conservatism that I grew up with, borne of meager resources and parents who were children of the Great Depression. He also catches the essence of the transformation Vermont has gone through when differing cultures and values encounter each other in the intimate surroundings of a small town where nearly everyone interacts, willingly or not. Grants Ferry is about a noble challenge laid out in a very interesting last will and testament of a woman whose simple and plain exterior belied some surprising desires and a rather stunning hidden wealth.


Saturday, June 15, 2013 at 5:00 PM
Australian Rohan Anderson talks about his incredible cookbook, Whole Larder Love

Whole Larder Love author and ultimate DIY-er Rohan Anderson is a family man and a modern-day hunter-gatherer living just outside the historical town of Ballarat, an 1800s gold rush town in Australia. Within this rural landscape, Anderson has capitalized on the opportunities for many a culinary adventure.

Primarily concerned with how to live off of the land and provide himself and his family with fresh, local food, Anderson has become a passionate hunter, fisher, forager, gardener, pickler, and sometimes barterer. Anderson now wants to share his secrets and experiences in order to help move people away from unhealthy eating habits and towards a more environmentally sustainable food industry. Through his blog, he has met James Fox, who grew up in Peru, Vermont. They have become friends and will finally meet when Rohan comes to Vermont. A remarkable book and a remarkable person.

At the bookstore. Reception and book signing to follow.


Sunday, June 23, 2013 at 4:00 PM
Brattleboro author David Blistein talk about his book, David’s Inferno, My Journey through the Dark Wood of Depression

David’s Inferno combines intensely personal reminiscences of the author’s two-year nervous breakdown with contemporary insight on depression and its treatment. This is, however, more than a memoir. With gentleness and wry humor, he includes very readable and often humorous discussions of neuropsychology, prescription medications, and alternative therapies, helping us see beyond the judgments and prejudices that all too often influence an individual’s treatment decisions.

The book also interweaves reflections on Dante’s The Divine Comedy with insights into depression’s profound short and long term impact on an individual’s relationships, creativity and spiritual life, and how the experience of deep depression has the potential to be transformative in unexpectedly positive ways. With a forward by Ken Burns. At the bookstore. Reception and book signing to follow.

Watch this trailer with David and Ken Burns: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ieyjW7uBG8Y&feature=youtu.be

At the bookstore. Reception and book signing to follow.

Sunday, May 19, 2013 at 7:00 PM
Poetry with the Stars, featuring poets Kate Gleason, Becky Sakellariou, and Patrice Pinette, followed by star gazing via telescope with the Vermont Astronomy Club

Inspired by the stars, astrophysics, and science, these three poets will present an evening of celestially-inspired poetry.


Kate Gleason


Kate Gleason
is the author of a full-length collection of poetry, Measuring the Dark and two chapbooks of poetry. Her work has appeared in Best American Poetry, Claiming the Spirit Within (Beacon Press) and numerous reviews. A Pushcart Prize Nominee and former editor of Peregrine Literary Journal, she teaches writing workshops and runs Writers Submit, a literary editing and submitting service.



Patrice Pinette

Patrice Pinette has been a featured poet in New Hampshire Poets Showcase and has been published by a number of literary journals and anthologies. She teaches creative writing and speech eurythmy, which embodies the dance of language at Antioch University New England and Center for Anthroposophy’s Renewal Program.





Becky Sakellariou

Poet Becky Sakellariou was raised in New England and has lived her adult life in Greece. Now she spends half of every year in New Hampshire. A Pushcart Anthology nominee, she has been published in a number of journals, including Common Ground Review, and her chapbook, The Importance of Bone was published in 2005. She is also the author of Earth Listening, a full length book of poetry. Her newest chapbook, What Shall I Cry? will be out in the fall of 2013.

At the bookstore. Reception and book signing to follow.


"The child is the father of the man"

Michael Palma returns for four Wednesdays in April at 7:00 PM - The Poetry of William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth (1770-1850) is one of the most important figures in the history of English poetry. His Lyrical Ballads (1798), co-written with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, is universally acknowledged to be the beginning of the Romantic Movement. In the enormously influential preface to its second edition two years later, Wordsworth famously called for a turn away from trivial subjects and artificial diction in favor of poetry about the lives of ordinary people written in "the real language of men."

Throughout his long life and prolific career, he upheld these principles, describing the lives of the common people of the English countryside and celebrating the beauties of nature as the manifestation of the divine-although some of his finest and most poignant poems also deal with loss and bereavement.

In addition to "The child is father of the man" (the title of the series), Wordsworth's poetry is the source of some of the most familiar phrases in the language, such as "needful things," "splendor in the grass," "trailing clouds of glory," "the vision splendid," and "The world is too much with us."

At the bookstore. Reservations encouraged. Free.

"Donations for the prof" are welcome. Text: William Wordsworth, The Major Works (Oxford University Press), $18.95


Sunday, April 7 at 4:00 PM
Chris Petrak presents, Tales (and More Tales) of Birding

Did you know that chick-a-dee-dee-dee is not the chickadee's song? It is its call. Its song is a low, sweet, whistled phebe...fee beeyee.

Want to know how starlings, the most hated bird in America, got here? A clue: William Shakespeare. Or why the wild turkey is no turkey? When the weather turns foul, birdwatcher and writer Chris Petrak pursues birds in his study, feathering his observations with those who have put pen to paper: the ornithologist, naturalist, storyteller, folklorist, lexicographer, poet. He distills these many resources into entertaining and informative essays for readers in Vermont and bloggers around the world. In his two collections, he reflects on birdwatching, provides engaging accounts on familiar birds, gives us glimpses at their amazing biology, and tells us about the men who pioneered ornithology and birdwatching in North America. An accomplished photographer, Chris has included beautiful illustrations along with his black and white photographs.

At the bookstore. Free.

 

Sunday, April 21 at 4:00 PM
Poet James Stack
reads from his new collection,Pleasures and Seasons of Vermont

Pleasures abound in Vermont and are captured in the beautiful poetry of Andover resident, James Stack. From black bears, first snowfall, and a stunning sunrise to the return of hummingbirds and the exuberance of darkness, Stack shares all that his brought him peace and joy living in Vermont.

At the bookstore. Free.

 

Caleb DaniloffSunday, January 13, 2013 at 4:00 PM Caleb Daniloff presents his new book, Running Ransom Road, a story of confronting the past, one marathon at a time.

From Running Ransom Road: “It's been almost a decade since I last wiped Budweiser foam from my lips. I don't wake up hung-over anymore, but I do sometimes wake up haunted -- by who I used to be, by the people I've done wrong. On the days I don't run, it's worse. I'm filled with a different kind of thirst, a need to move between places -- across bridges, over water, over city lines. The nastier the conditions, the better: lightning storms, ice-covered sidewalks, predawn country roads during hunting season. The hard work of the run fortifies my will. I move through this so I can move through that. One foot in front of the other. One run at a time”.

Running Ransom Road, Daniloff’s memoir of how running marathons helped save his life, is the incredibly moving story of his journey of self discovery and self-acceptance after years of alcoholism. Everyone should read this book.

Reception and book signing. At the bookstore.



New Voices 2013  Saturday, January 26, 2013 at The Stone Church in Chester, Vermont 2:00-5:00 PM

Admission: $10

Misty Valley Books presents its annual weekend of authors reading from their first books. Now in its 19th year, we have welcomed Matthew Dicks (Something Mi sing, Milo), Hillary Jordan (Mudbound, When She Woke), Alex Berenson (The Faithful Spy, Ghost War), Dennis Lehane (Mystic River, The Given Day), Steve Almond (Candy Freak, Which Brings Me to You), Emily Mitchell (The Last Summer of the World), Arthur Golden (Memoirs of a Geisha), James Collins (Beginner's Greek), Gregory Maguire (Wicked), Lewis Robinson (Water Dogs), Elena Gorokhova (A Mountain of Crumbs), Heidi Durrow (The Girl Who Fell from the Sky), Jennifer Egan (The Invisible Circus, A Visit from the Goon Squad), Betty Shotton (Lift Off Leadership), Paul Grossman (The Sleepwalkers) and many others.


Authors include:


Carole DeSanti
, The Unruly Passions of
Eugenie R.

Eugénie R., born in France’s foie gras country, follows the man she loves to Paris, but soon finds herself marooned, pregnant, and penniless. She gives birth to a daughter she is forced to abandon and spends the next ten years fighting to get her back. An outcast, Eugénie takes to the streets, navigating her way up from ruin and charting the treacherous waters of sexual commerce. Along the way she falls in love with an artist, a woman, and a revolutionary. The capital, the gleaming center of art and civilization in Europe, is enjoying its final years of wanton prosperity before galloping headlong into the Franco-Prussian War. For Eugénie it is a conflicted landscape — grisly, evocative, addictive. As the gates of the city close against the advancing army, Eugénie must make a decision between past and present — between the people she loves most. Carole DeSanti, known for her championing of independent, high-quality voices in women’s fiction as an editor at Penguin, has been clandestinely writing The Unruly Passions of Eugénie R. for over a decadw. www.caroledesanti.net


Dr. Eben Alexander
, III, Proof of Heaven

Dr. Eben Alexander III has been an academic neurosurgeon for the last 25 years, including 15 years at the Brigham & Women's and the Children's Hospitals and Harvard Medical School in Boston. Over his academic career he authored or co-authored over 150 chapters and papers in peer reviewed journals, and made over 200 presentations at conferences and medical centers around the world. He thought he had a very good idea of how the brain generates consciousness, mind and spirit. In the predawn hours of November 10, 2008, he was driven into coma by a rare and mysterious bacterial meningitis-encephalitis of unknown cause. He spent a week in coma on a ventilator, his prospects for survival diminishing rapidly. On the seventh day, to the surprise of everyone, he started to awaken. Memories of his life had been completely deleted inside of coma, yet he awoke with memories of a fantastic odyssey deep into another realm - more real than this earthly one.

“Proof of Heaven is more than just an awe-inspiring account of a profound encounter with spiritual reality. Dr. Alexander’s neuro-science career taught him that near-death experiences are brain-based illusions, and yet his personal experience left him dumbstruck.  His honest struggle to make sense of this unforgettable journey is a gripping story, unique in the literature of spiritual experiences, that may well change how we understand our role in the universe.” Bruce Greyson, MD, Carlson Professor of Psychiatry & Neurobehavioral Sciences, University of Virginia School of Medicine; co-editor, The Handbook of Near-Death Experiences. ”His wonderful and fascinating book, Proof of Heaven, touched my heart by his honesty and by his obvious acceptance of the many consequences for his personal and professional life. In his book he describes in detail what happened in his consciousness, he writes about his search to understand what happened to him as a human being, and also to explain what happened to him as an academic neurosurgeon. He concludes that enhanced consciousness was experienced beyond the body and the brain, and that the brain inevitably and convincingly cannot be the producer of consciousness.” Pim van Lommel, MD.  www.lifebeyonddeath.net


Jessica Maria Tuccelli
, Glow

In the autumn of 1941, Amelia J. McGee, a young woman of Cherokee and Scotch-Irish descent, and an outspoken pamphleteer for the NAACP, hastily sends her daughter, Ella, alone on a bus home to Georgia in the middle of the night—a desperate measure that proves calamitous when the child encounters two drifters and is left for dead on the side of the road. Shot through with Cherokee lore and hoodoo conjuring, Glow transports us from Washington D.C., on the brink of World War II to the Blue Ridge frontier of 1836.

The Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance named Glow a 2012 Okra Pick, its highest honor. According to the Fredericksburg Freelance Star, Glow is “full of love, hate, discrimination, heartbreak, hardiness, ghosts and hoodoo. A graduate of MIT with a degree in anthropology, she travels the globe, where she finds inspirations for her stories. Tuccelli is a Writer-in-Residence at the Brooklyn PowderKeg.  www.jessicamariatuccelli.com

 


Maryanne O’Hara
, Cascade

1935: In a small town fighting for its survival, a conflicted new wife with artistic promise is forced to choose between duty and desire. Desdemona Hart Spaulding was an up-and-coming Boston artist when she married in haste and settled in the small, once-fashionable theater town of Cascade to provide a home for her dying father. Now Cascade is on the short list to be flooded to provide water for Boston, and Dez’s discontent is complicated by her growing attraction to a fellow artist. When tragic events unfold, Dez is forced to make difficult choices between staying in a loveless marriage and setting herself free to become the artist she wants to be.

A fascinating look at what may have happened to the town  swallowed by the Quabbin Resevoir near Boston. www.maryanneohara.com/cascade

 

 


Kieran Shields
, The Truth of All Things

Two hundred years after the Salem witch trials, in the summer of 1892, a grisly new witch hunt is beginning....When newly appointed Deputy Marshal Archie Lean is called in to investigate a prostitute's murder in Portland, Maine, he's surprised to find the body laid out like a pentagram and pinned to the earth with a pitchfork.  He's even more surprised to learn that this death by "sticking" is a traditional method of killing a witch. Baffled by the ritualized murder scene, Lean secretly enlists the help of historian Helen Prescott and brilliant criminalist Perceval Grey.  Distrusted by officials because of his mixed Abenaki Indian ancestry, Grey is even more notorious for combining modern investigative techniques with an almost eerie perceptiveness.  Although skeptical of each other's methods, together the detectives pursue the killer's trail through postmortems and opium dens, into the spiritualist societies and lunatic asylums of gothic New England.

Before the killer closes in on his final victim, Lean and Grey must decipher the secret pattern to these murders--a pattern hidden within the dark history of the Salem witch trials. Kieran Shields grew up in Portland, Maine. He graduated from Dartmouth College and the University of Maine School of Law.  He continues to reside along the coast of Maine with his wife and two children.

 

Schedule and Location

The readings/discussions will take place at the First Universalist Church in Chester’s Stone Village at 2:00 PM. The schedule includes opportunities for the public to meet the authors skiing or snowshoeing at Grafton Ponds, at the reception after the readings, or at a wine and cheese reception followed by dinner at the Fullerton Inn on the Green in Chester. Many local inns will be offering special New Voices packages.

Schedule for Saturday, January 26, 2013

9:00 AM:
Cross country skiing/snowshoeing at Grafton Ponds Cross Country Ski Touring Center (802 843-2400) info@graftonponds.com

2:00 PM-5:00 PM:
Readings at the Historic Stone Church in Chester with reception & book signing afterwards

DUE TO LIMITED SEATING, ADMISSION WILL BE BY TICKET ONLY. TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLY AT MISTY VALLEY BOOKS FOR $10. TICKETS MUST BE PRE-PURCHASED AT THE STORE (YOU CAN CALL WITH CREDIT CARD AND PICK UP YOUR TICKETS AT THE “WILL CALL” TABLE AT THE EVENT. NO TICKETS SOLD AT THE DOOR. 802 875-3400

5:45-6:30 PM:
Wine & Cheese reception in front of the fire (cash bar)

6:30-8:00 PM:
Dinner with authors at The Fullerton Inn $28.00 buffet DUE TO LIMITED SEATING, RESERVATIONS REQUIRED. CALL THE FULLERTON INN AT 802 875-2444

For more information, call Misty Valley Books at 802 875-3400. The Historic Stone Church is located on North Street, Route 103 North, in the historic Stone Village. www.chestervtuu.org

S. S.TaylorSunday, December 9, 2012   2:00-4:00 PM  Come meet S. S.Taylor (aka Sarah Stewart Taylor), author of The Expeditioners.

Computers have failed, electricity is extinct, and the race to discover new lands is underway! Brilliant explorer Alexander West has just died under mysterious circumstances, but not before smuggling half of a strange map to his intrepid children—Kit the brain, M.K. the tinkerer, and Zander the brave. Why are so many government agents trying to steal the half-map? (And where is the other half?) It’s up to Alexander’s children—the Expeditioners—to get to the bottom of these questions, and fast. In this series kickoff, Taylor (Amelia Earhart: This Broad Ocean) introduces a fascinating world where history took a different turn. . . The author's evident love of maps and exploration strengthens this Indiana Jones-style adventure, which is filled with nifty gadgets, moments of moderate terror, and high stakes. Taylor will sign her books. Holiday refreshments.

 

Roland MerulloSaturday, December 15, 2012 5:00 PM Roland Merullo discusses his new book, Lunch with Buddha - a sequel to Breakfast with Buddha. Dinner with author afterwards at local restaurant. Call for details.

Merullo’s best-selling book Breakfast with Buddha, changed thousands of lives (“Why so angry?”) with the story of publisher Otto Ringling and his cross country trip with a Buddhist monk. A novel about family, open-minded spirituality, and the American road, Lunch with Buddha accompanies the characters from Breakfast with Buddha as they move  further along the path toward lasting peace of mind. Facing one of life’s greatest emotional challenges, Otto takes comfort in a loving family and offbeat lessons from the eccentric spiritual leader, Volya Rinpoche. Funny yet heartbreaking, Lunch with Buddha offers a fresh and engaging perspective on the life we live now.

 

Henry HomeyerSunday, December 16 2:00-4:00 PM Henry Homeyer with illustrator, Joshua Yunger, will sign and read from their book for young adults, Wobar and the Quest for the Magic Calumet

A fantasy-adventure story about a boy born with a mustache and an ability to talk with animals. Wobar's adventures begin when he runs away from home after getting in trouble at his new school. Hiding out in a cave, he meets a cougar, Roxie, who becomes his best friend and constant companion.

Wobar encounters the ghost of a Revolutionary War soldier who was given -- and had stolen from him -- a calumet or Native American peace pipe. The pipe has the power to end all wars and until it is found and returned to the American president, the ghost must remain in limbo. Wobar and Roxie travel to New Orleans -- by freight train, boat and cargo plane -- where a gypsy fortune teller helps them with their quest. Throughout, Wobar tries to do the right thing, even when it means facing danger, loneliness, or adversity. Homeyer, a writer, storyteller, master gardener, and grandfather, told this tale one summer when he was running a playground program in Saxtons River, Vermont. He has been in the Peace Corps in Africa, and a peace activist since the Vietnam War. He dreams of a real calumet that can end all wars. At the bookstore. Holiday refreshments.


Vermont Voices; Three Sundays in November at 2:00 at The Stone Church in Chester

Archie MayorSunday, November 4 at 2:00 PM  Archer Mayor returns to Chester to discuss his newest Joe Gunther mystery, ParadiseCity.

In his 23rd appearance, Joe Gunther, with his team at the Vermont Bureau of Investigation, is alerted to a string of unrelated burglaries across Vermont. Someone, in addition to flatscreens, computers, and stereos, has also been stealing antiques and jewelry. Meanwhile, in Boston, an elderly woman surprises some thieves in her Beacon Hill home and is viciously murdered. The Boston police find that not only is the loot similar to what’s being stolen in Vermont, but it may have the same destination. Word is out that someone powerful is purchasing these particular kinds of items in the “Paradise City” of Northampton, Mass. Gunther, the Boston Police, and the vengeful niece of the murdered old lady convene on Northampton, eager to get to the bottom of the mystery and find the “responsible parties”—although each is motivated to mete out some very different penalties. Understated, occasionally very funny (see Kunkle) and very intelligent. The Sage of Brattleboro remains as appealing as ever. At the Stone Church in Chester. Reception and book signing. Free

William Sterne RandallSunday, November 11 at 2:00 PM Author Willard Sterne Randall talks about his biography, Ethan Allen, His Life and Times.

While Ethan Allen’s legend has endured through four centuries of American history, he remains, perhaps, the least understood of America’s founding fathers. Willard Sterne Randall, author of Benedict Arnold: Patriot and Traitor, and Thomas Jefferson: A Life, finally gives a three-dimensional portrait to this venerated leader of the Green Mountain Boys, a man whose fame was so great that he became a mythical figure, even in his own lifetime. Randall chronicles Allen’s upward struggle from precocious, if not unruly, adolescent to commander of the largest American paramilitary force on the eve of the Revolution. He traces Allen from his modest beginnings in Connecticut and illuminates his deeply rebellious nature, his attraction to deism, his dramatic defense of smallpox vaccinations, and his early support of separation of church and state. Allen emerges as a fascinating public spirited leader but also as a self-interested individual, often no less rapacious than his archenemies in the Hudson and Mohawk Valleys. Reception and book signing. Free

Madeleine KuninSunday, November 18 at 2:00 PM Governor Madeleine Kunin presents her new book, The New Feminist Agenda: Defining the Next Revolution for Women, Work, and Family

Feminists opened up thousands of doors in the 1960s and 1970s, but decades later, are U.S. women where they thought they'd be?  The answer, it turns out, is a resounding no. Surely there have been gains. Women now comprise nearly 60 percent of college undergraduates and half of all medical and law students. They have entered the workforce in record numbers, making the two-wage-earner family the norm. But combining a career and family turned out to be more complicated than expected. While women changed, social structures surrounding work and family remained static. Affordable and high-quality child care, paid family leave, and equal pay for equal work remain elusive for the vast majority of working women.  In fact, the nation has fallen far behind other parts of the world on the gender-equity front.  We lag behind more than seventy countries when it comes to the percentage of women holding elected federal offices. Only 17 percent of corporate boards include women members. And just 5 percent of Fortune 500 companies are led by women.

It’s time, says Madeleine M. Kunin, to change all that. Looking back over five decades of advocacy, she analyzes where progress stalled, looks at the successes of other countries, and charts the course for the next feminist revolution—one that mobilizes women, and men, to call for the kind of government and workplace policies that can improve the lives of women and strengthen their families.  Reception and book signing.

 

Four Wednesdays, September 26-October 10, 17, 24, 2012
Michael Palma
, returning to Misty Valley Books, will consider the poetry of T.S. Eliot on four Wednesday evenings.

Proferssor Michael Palma, returning to Misty Valley Books on the Green in Chester, will this time consider the poetry of T. S. Eliot on four Wednesday evenings. The series, beginning September 26, is entitled Mixing Memory and Desire. The free sessions will begin at 7 pm and last about an hour. The final session will be on October 24.

This seminar will focus on the work of one of the greatest and most influential poets of the twentieth century. The title of the series, "Mixing Memory and Desire," comes from the opening lines of Eliot's most famous poem, The Waste Land.

Eliot (1888-1965) was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri. After graduating from Harvard, he spent a year in Paris and then lived the last fifty years of his life in London. At the beginning of his career, poems such as "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" and "Portrait of a Lady" brought a new note of modernism into English-language poetry. With its faultless rhythms and brilliant imagery, his work also revealed a gift for memorable phrase-making: "April is the cruelest month" and "This is the way the world ends / Not with a bang but a whimper."

A fascinating and complex figure, Eliot has entered into popular culture in remarkable ways. His tortured first marriage has provoked several biographical studies, as well as a play (and film), Tom and Viv. And his collection of light verse, Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats, was the inspiration for the second-longest-running show in Broadway history.

Palma, an acclaimed poet and translator, led the spellbinding and insightful discussions of Robert Frost's poetry at Misty Valley Books in the summer of 2007. Since then he has taken all comers on a tour of hell with Dante's Inferno, a subject with which Palma is especially conversant as he has done a brilliant translation. In subsequent seminars, ten in all, Palma talked about Emily Dickinson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Edwin Arlington Robinson, and his own poetry. Then it was Elizabeth Bishop and Robert Lowell, W.H. Auden , Wilfred Owen and Philip Larkin, and, last spring, May Swenson and Robert Hayden.

Michael Palma's own poetry has appeared in numerous periodicals and anthologies. He has been awarded prizes for his translations from the Academy of American Poets and Columbia University. He has collaborated with the National Endowment for the Arts and has written several teacher and reader guides for the NEA's Big Read program.

He is also an essayist, editor, critic and translator of other Italian poets, and his Inferno translation was reissued last year as a handsome Norton Critical Edition paperback. He lives with his wife, Victoria, in Bellows Falls.

The public is encouraged to attend all the sessions, which are offered free of charge, but everyone is welcome at any of the evenings. An edition of Eliot's collected poems is available for sale at the Bookstore.

 

Sunday, October 14, 2012 at 4:00 Joanna Luloff will discuss her new book, The Beach at Galle Road, a novel in stories of Sri Lanka.

When rumors of civil war between the ruling Sinhalese and the Tamils in the northern sector of Sri Lanka reach those who live in the south, somehow it seems not to be happening in their own country. At least not until Janaki's sister, Lakshmi--now a refugee whose husband has disappeared--comes back to live with her family. And when Sam, an American Peace Corps worker who boards with Janaki's family, falls in love with one of his students, a young girl from the north, he, too, becomes acutely aware of the dangers that exist for any- one who gets drawn into the conflict, however marginally.

Skillfully weaving together the stories of these and other intersecting lives, The Beach at Galle Road explores themes of memory and identity amid the consequences of the Sri Lankan civil war. From different points of view, across generations and geographies, it pits the destructive power of war against the resilient power of family, individual will, and the act of storytelling itself.

At the Bookstore.

Thursday, August 16, 2012 at 7:00 PM Ludlow author, Rachel Carter, talks about her debut novel, So Close to You

Lydia Bentley has heard stories about the Montauk Project all her life from her beloved grandfather, stories about the experiments that took place at the abandoned military base near her home and the people who've disappeared over the years, including her great grandfather. When she stumbles into a hidden bunker and finds herself in a vessel that transports her to a dangerous and strange new reality, Lydia realizes that all the stories she's ever heard about the Montauk Project are true-and that she's in the middle of one of the most dangerous experiments in history. So Close to You, published by HarperCollins, is written with young adults in mind but is a page-turner for older readers, too.

Rachel Carter grew up in Ludlow, Vermont and graduated from Black River High School. She is a graduate of the University of Vermont and Columbia University, where she recently received her MFA in nonfiction writing. Rachel has been a teacher, a nanny, a caterer, and a bellhop. She is currently at work on her next book in Brooklyn, NY, where she now lives.

A reception and book signing will follow Carter's remarks.

 

Sunday, September 16, 2012 at 4:00 PM Barrie Dunsmore, former foreign correspondent for ABC News talks about his life in There and Back , Commentary by a former Foreign Correspondent

With a foreword by Ted Koppel In an era of instant access to worldwide news, we are lucky to have voices who can speak from the vantage point of many years of on-the-ground experience. Barrie Dunsmore, who traveled the world for over thirty years as a foreign correspondent with ABC News, has one of those voices. He is able to analyze current events with a veteran reporter's eye, a humble sense of humor, and a longer view of history than most contemporary opinion-based news sources. He is a careful keeper of our collective world history, and as such offers an important and increasingly rare perspective on current events. The collection of pieces in There and Back offers quick and sometimes witty entrances into decade-long discussions about Middle East policy, superpower strategies, and controversial domestic issues. Dunsmore comments on various aspects of recent Middle Eastern history: the Arab Spring revolutions, America's wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and the nuclear threats posed by Iran's theocratic government. He takes us inside the arms races of the Cold War, relying heavily on his coverage of the diplomatic relations between the U.S. and the Soviets during that time. He also takes us through a tour de force of commentary on politics, current events, cultural phenomena, and leadership within the U.S. Dunsmore's grounded and non-sensational approach to writing allows him to thoughtfully explain the world issues inherited by this generation. It is because of his experience abroad that Dunsmore is able to observe domestic events with such accurate focus. He uses his deep knowledge of historical events, many of which he lived through and reported on, to simplify the decades of policy and diplomacy that have led us to today. After reading Dunsmore's careful encapsulations of complicated international relationships, today's global situations suddenly become clearer. This collection of columns are the offerings of a mind sharply tuned to the long view of truth and to a lifetime of practicing thoughtful reflection.

At the bookstore. Free.


July 12-August 9, 2012 Chester Summer Music Series

Chester's Summer Music Series returns to the Academy Building lawn in downtown Chester with five Thursday night concerts from 6:30-8:00 pm starting July 12, 2012. Kicking off the series is the dynamic Dave Keller Band on July 12, followed by Chester's own Chris Kleeman and his band on July 19. New this year is an exciting trio from Putney, VT, Easy Street with Lisa Brande, Mark Trichka, and Jeff Potter on drums on July 26. The unforgettable Starline Rhythm Boys will be back on August 2, and the series concludes with Chester born and bred Rusty Belle out of Northampton, Mass on August 9. Bring your blankets and lawn chairs and be prepared to sit back and listen to great music on a summer night right in downtown Chester. In case of inclement weather, concerts will move to The Stone Hearth Inn on Route 11 West.

All concerts are free. For more information contact 875-3400.

 

Thursday, July 26, 2012 at 5:00 PM* Reeve Lindbergh discusses Against Wind and Tide, Letters & Journals 1947-1986, a collection of her mother, writer Anne Morrow Lindbergh's previously unpublished diaries and letters.

This sixth and final collection takes us from 1947 to 1986 , between her fortieth and eightieth birthdays and is "a treasury of vivid, poignant, perceptive, and often delightful pieces of communication, each in its own way, directed toward a greater understanding of what it means to be a human being, a writer, and a mother. Anne Morrow Lindbergh struggled with issues women and men have had to face in every era: what to make of a complex, difficult marriage to a person one loves; how to reconcile the impulse toward creativity- and the need to work- with the practical demands of home and family". A remarkable woman, Anne Morrow Lindbergh comes to life through the skillful editing of her daughter, Reeve, and continues to inspire us.

At the bookstore. Free. (*note different time)



Sunday, July 15, 2012 at 4:00 PM Ernest Hebert presents his newest novel, Never Back Down

In Dartmouth professor Ernest Hebert's most autobiographical novel to date, Jack Landry, haunted by dreams of a tragedy that occurred centuries before he was born, is introduced as a promising high school baseball player from the mill town of Keene, New Hampshire. A young boy when the novel opens in July 1953, Jack and his best friend, Elphege Beaupre, devise a motto to live by: Never back down, never instigate. It's a rule of stubborn passivity Jack will follow to the end of his days. Unconsciously burdened by his French-Canadian heritage, hemmed in by his working-class parents' submission to authority, the church, and a life of hard work, young Jack still has big dreams. Yet his warring values and desires lead to two mistakes in his youth that will color the rest of his days. The first causes great harm to his first and only love, a half-Cajun Gulf Coast girl (and the boss's daughter). In a world where one is asked to take responsibilities for actions but perhaps not suffer the consequences, Jack punishes himself. Following the tenets of Catholicism, he embarks on a lifelong penance to atone for his sin. The subsequent renunciation of his dreams appears to be Jack's second mistake. But is it? Hebert is a master storyteller who, in addition to creating memorable characters and gripping narratives, does not shy away from the big questions. In Never Back Down, he raises more than a few: At what price, success? Is redemption possible? Can one live by a motto? What does it mean to take responsibility? The portrait Hebert gives us of Jack Landry's life of menial labor, joie de vivre, and a love that just won't die not only raises these questions but answers them as well. Ernest Hebert lives in New Hampshire and teaches writing at Dartmouth College. His novels in­clude The Old American and the acclaimed six-volume Darby series.

At the bookstore. Free.

 

SAVE THIS DATE

Four Wednesdays starting April 11, 2012 at 7:00 PM - The Pure Suit of Happiness with Michael Palma

Michael Palma, returning to Misty Valley Books on the Green in Chester, will consider the poetry of May Swenson and Robert Hayden on four Wednesday evenings. The series, beginning April 11, is entitled The Pure Suit of Happiness, the name of a poem by Swenson. The free sessions will begin at 7 pm and last about an hour.

Palma, an acclaimed poet and translator, led the spellbinding and insightful discussions of Robert Frost's poetry at Misty Valley Books in the summer of 2007 in a four-week series called Frost in July. Since then he has taken all comers on a tour of hell with Dante's Inferno, a subject with which Palma is especially conversant as he has done a brilliant translation. In spring 2009, Palma talked about Emily Dickinson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Edwin Arlington Robinson, and his own poetry. Then it was Elizabeth Bishop and Robert Lowell, Wilfred Owen and Philip Larken, and W.H. Auden and Robert Browning.

This time, the series will feature readings from and discussions of the work of two underappreciated American poets whose centenaries are approaching, May Swenson (1913-1989) and Robert Hayden (1913-1980).

Born in Utah, May Swenson spent most of her life in the eastern United States. Her work is marked by exuberance, fascination with the world and everything in it, endless technical innovation, and irrepressible wit-as shown in the titles of several of her books: A Cage of Spines, Poems to Solve, and New and Selected Things Taking Place. She was also one of the first English translators of the most recent Nobel laureate, Tomas Tranströmer.

Marginalized for many years, Robert Hayden slowly emerged as one of the central poets of a rich generation. Quiet, serious, carefully crafted, and emotionally powerful, his work ranges from painful personal recollections (including the classic "Those Winter Sundays") to historical narratives and spiritual meditations. He served two terms as Poetry Consultant to the Library of Congress (the position now known as Poet Laureate), the first African American to be so honored.

Books are available at the bookstore. Reservations appreciated (875-3400)

 



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Sunday, April 22, 2012 In celebration of National Poetry Month, local poets John Wood and Michael Palma read from their own works.

Michael Palma's own poetry has been published in three books and numerous periodicals and anthologies. His latest book is entitled A Fortune in Gold. Awarded prizes for his translations from the Academy of American Poets and Columbia University, Palma has collaborated with the National Endowment for the Arts and has written several teacher and reader guides for the NEA's Big Read program. He is also an essayist, editor, critic and translator of other Italian poets, and his Inferno translation was reisssued last year as a handsome Norton Critical Edition paperback. He lives with his wife, Victoria, in Bellows Falls

John Wood, as well as being a poet, is an art critic and photographic historian. Allen Ginsberg wrote the introduction to his first book, which was published when Wood was in his early twenties. His next two books, In Primary Light and The Gates of the Elect Kingdom, both won the University of Iowa Press Poetry Prize, and others of his books have been named to the Outstanding Books of the Year lists by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and the American Library Association. A new book of his poems accompanied by 19th century photographs has just been published in Germany, and he has written or edited over twenty-five books on photographic history and contemporary photographers. He has held professorships for over thirty years in both English Literature and Photographic History, and he has lectured and read at many universities both here and abroad. He lives with his wife, Carol, in Saxtons River, VT.

Reception to follow.


At the bookstore. Free.

 



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Sunday, May 6, 2012 at 4:00 PM
Howard Frank Mosher presents his new adventure (and book), The Great Northern Express: A Writer's Journey Home

Several months before novelist Howard Frank Mosher turned sixty-five, he learned that he had prostate cancer. Following forty-six intensive radiation treatments, Mosher set out alone in his twenty-year-old Chevy Celebrity on a monumental road trip and book tour across twenty-first-century America. From a chance meeting with an angry moose in northern New England to late-night walks on the wildest sides of America's largest cities, The Great Northern Express chronicles Mosher's escapades with an astonishing array of erudite bibliophiles, homeless hitchhikers, country crooners and strippers, and aspiring writers of all circumstances. Full of high and low comedy and rollicking adventures, this is part travel memoir, part autobiography, and pure, anarchic fun. From coast to coast and border to border, this unforgettable adventure of a top-notch American writer demonstrates that, sometimes, in order to know who we truly are, we must turn the wheel towards home.

Reception and book signing.

At the bookstore. Free.

 



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Sunday, April 15, 2012 at 4:00 PM
Tovar Cerulli presents his book
, The Mindful Carnivore: A Vegetarian's Hunt for Sustenance

As a boy, Tovar Cerulli spent his summers fishing for trout and hunting bullfrogs. While still in high school, he began to experiment with vegetarianism. By the age of twenty he was a vegan. A decade later, in the face of declining health, he returned to omnivory and within a few years found himself heading into the woods, rifle in hand.

In this deeply personal narrative, Cerulli explores our nutritional connections with the larger-than-human world. From a fateful encounter with a brook trout to a rekindled relationship with the only hunter in his family, he traces the evolution of his dietary philosophy. Contemplating vegetable gardens, farm fields, and deer woods with intellectual and emotional candor, he stalks both food and meaning.

Cerulli's tale brings nuance to conversations often dominated by black-and-white thinking. He sets contemporary debates in context by looking back over centuries of history, delving into our changing natural and cultural landscapes, and examining the shifting meanings of vegetarianism and hunting. In place of moral certainties, he offers questions.

Can hunters and vegetarians be motivated by similar values and instincts? In this time of intensifying concern over ecological degradation and animal welfare, how do we make peace with the fact that, even in growing organic vegetables, life is sustained by death?

At once compassionate and probing, The Mindful Carnivore invites us to reconsider what it means to eat.

Book signing and reception.

At the bookstore. Free.

 



SAVE THIS DATE

Sunday, February 19, 2012 at 4:00 PM Chester author Linda Cunningham talks about her new book, Small Town Girl

When Lauren Smith begrudgingly returns to the small Vermont town where she grew up to arrange for the sale of her late grandmother's old farmhouse, she has everything she's always worked for. Lauren drives a Mercedes. She's
engaged to one of the most powerful businessmen in the country and wears a three-carat diamond ring to prove it. She lives in a penthouse on Central Park West. Yes, Lauren has everything she considers important. She is smugly prepared for any eventuality in dealing with these country people so Lauren isn't surprised when the hot water isn't working at the old house. No problem. She simply looks in the phone book and calls the local plumber.

The moment Caleb Cochran steps through the old screen door to fix the hot water, the glittery facade that masquerades as Lauren's life begins to crumble around her. Though she tries hard to deny their mutual, magnetic attraction, Lauren is finally forced to reevaluate her focus and come face-to-face with her true self. Small Town Girl is a story of discovering the true meaning of life and love.

Reception and book signing. At the bookstore.

 



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Sunday, March 4, 2012 at 4:00 PM Elayne Clift, Hester's Daughters

Elayne Clift's new novel about a modern-day Hester whose "A" stands for autonomy! Clift renders a stirring, contemporary retelling of Nathaniel Hawthorne's classic, The Scarlet Letter. She captures the spirit of Hester and Pearl and recasts them in a dramatic, compelling and expansive story cutting across time and culture and revealing connections that bind the hearts of women, no matter the century. If you haven't read The Scarlet Letter, read it now. If you read it long ago, read it again. Then savor this contemporary, feminist retelling of an American classic from a writer who gives us back a stronger, more resilient 20th century Hester for whom living a meaningful life is paramount. An added bonus is getting to know her daughter, Pearl, whose life is a reflection on what our mothers can teach us, if we are ready to learn.

A book signing and reception will follow Elayne's talk.

 



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Sunday, March 11, 2012 at 4:00 PM, Donna Hicks, Ph.D., Dignity: The Essential Role It Plays in Resolving Conflict

Internationally acclaimed conflict resolution facilitator, Associate, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard Univeristy, and author of the life affirming and honorable resolution based book Dignity: The Essential Role It Plays in Resolving Conflict, Donna Hicks, Ph.D., describes how dignity is the motivating force behind all human interaction. Whether it's in families, communities, the business world, or at the international level, people have the desire to be treated well and with dignity.

Donna Hicks points out that if dignity is violated, then the result is aggression, violence, and hatred. Without dignity, the human connection disappears. Donna Hicks offers people an understanding of dignity, which is little understood, despite its universal desire. She examines the gap in the understanding and honoring of dignity and shares a fresh set of strategies for becoming aware of the role of dignity, and how to put it into practice in all of our interactions , be it a school board meeting, a town council meeting, union negotiations, or employer/employee relations.

Book signing and reception to follow Donna Hick's talk.

At the bookstore.

 



SAVE THIS DATE

Sunday, February 5 at 4:00 PM
Beach Conger, M.D. presents his book, It's
Probably Nothing: More Adventures of a Vermont Country Doctor

Hiram Stedrock sat in the examining room worried about a family member in distress. Her name was Gloria. She was a cow. When Dr. Beach Conger = returns to Vermont, after several years in Philadelphia, he reenters a medical practice that is worlds away from big-city medicine.

In It's Probably Nothing, Conger learns that his patients-from Pauline Pontifact to Uptah
Corless-need him more than ever to teach them how to navigate the modern medical maze. This collection of stories showcases Conger's irreverent view
into the doctor's role and his profound empathy for the characters he encounters along the way. Conger also examines how medicine-and problems
with our current health-care system-can remain the same and yet feel vastly different whether you're a small-town farmer or an urban resident.

Reception and book signing. At the bookstore.

 



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Saturday, January 28, 2012
New Voices 2012

Misty Valley Books presents its annual weekend of authors reading from their first books. Now in its 18th year, we have welcomed Matthew Dicks (Something Mi sing, Milo), Hillary Jordan (Mudbound, When She Woke), Alex Berenson (The Faithful Spy, Ghost War), Dennis Lehane (Mystic River, The Given Day), Steve Almond (Candy Freak, Which Brings Me to You), Emily Mitchell (The Last Summer of the World), Arthur Golden (Memoirs of a Geisha), James Collins (Beginner's Greek), Gregory Maguire (Wicked), Lewis Robinson (Water Dogs), Elena Gorokhova (A Mountain of Crumbs), Heidi Durrow (The Girl Who Fell from the Sky), Jennifer Egan (The Invisible Circus, A Visit from the Goon Squad), and many others.

The readings/discussions will take place at the Vermont Institute of Contemporary Arts (new venue)* at 2:00 PM. The schedule includes opportunities for the public to meet the authors skiing or snowshoeing at Grafton Ponds, at the reception after the readings, or at a wine and cheese reception followed by dinner at the Fullerton Inn on the Green in Chester. Many local inns will be offering special New Voices packages.


New Voices 2012 authors are:



Betty Shotton
Liftoff Leadership


Christopher Boucher
How to Keep Your Volkswagen Alive


Katharine Britton
Her Sister's Shadow


Naomi Benaron
Running The Rift


Paul Grossman
The Sleepwalkers

Betty Shotton
Liftoff Leadership

Pilots and leaders have a lot in common. Betty Shotton, a pilot , CEO, serial entrepreneur, and lifelong leader, is an advocate for meaningful and principled leadership. In her book, she thoughtfully guides readers through ten principles, including courage, integrity, possibility, and awe, utilizing theory complemented by a values- driven narrative filled with personal stories from the C suite and intriguing tales from the cockpit. She is a commercially trained pilot, with 35 years experience as a CEO, and travels the country speaking on the need to return to and integrate fundamental values that benefit mankind. She has served on the board of CapeAir and currently is on the board of First Flight Foundation. www.liftoffleadership.com


Christopher Boucher
How to Keep Your Volkswagen Alive

Trying to explain this book - its complexity, its brilliance, the
way it makes perfectly emotional sense even though almost everything about
it is, on the surface, absurd- is a challenge. The jacket reads."If you
think raising a kid in today's world is hard, imagine how tough it would be
if your child happened to be a Volkswagen Beetle." For all the surrealism
that you should be prepared for, there is nothing glib about this book. The narrator's son, the VW, is ill throughout and getting sicker. He's prone to breakdowns and struggling with rust. Boucher's world is made up of absolutely human and recognizable truths: it's unspeakably sad when a parent dies; it's really scary when your child is seriously ill; it can be comforting to avoid change, to stay close to home. We all run on stories and Boucher's is wildly imaginative and masterful. www.vwalive.com


Katharine Britton
Her Sister's Shadow

Lilli Niles is at home in her North London flat when she receives an unexpected call. Her elder sister, Bea - at the family homestead in White Head, Massachusetts - has just lost her husband, and she'd like Lilli to fly home for the funeral. Lilli, a painter, is preparing for her latest gallery opening. And more to the point, there are reasons she moved all the way to England to escape her older sister, reasons that have kept them estranged for decades. But something in Bea's voice makes Lilli think it's time to return to the stately house in New England she loved as a child, to the memory of a shared loss - and to a time when simple sisterhood was enough to overcome betrayal and resentment. Katharine Britton has a Master of Arts in Creative Writing f rom Dartmouth College, teaches at Colby-Sawyer College, and at The Writers' Center. www.katharinebritton.com


Naomi Benaron
Running The Rift

Awarded the prestigious Bellwether Prize (like two former New
Voices, Hillary Jordan and Heidi Durrow) for its treatment of compelling social issues, Benaron's novel is a powerful portrait of an alarming episode in global history, the Rwandan Genocide, through the eyes of a runner, Jean Patrick Nkuba, the son of a murdered school teacher, who dreams of bringing peace to his country and equality to his Tutsi compatriots by representing Rwanda at the Olympics. A beautiful and heart-rending story.
www.naomibenaron.com


Paul Grossman
The Sleepwalkers

Berlin, 1932. In the final weeks of the Weimar Republic, as Hitler and his National Socialist Party angle to assume control of Germany, beautiful girls are seen sleepwalking through the streets. When a young woman of mysterious origin is pulled dead from the Havel River with her legs bizarrely deformed, Berlin Inspektor-Detektiv Willi Kraus, a veteran of World War I who earned the Iron Cross for bravery and who happens to be Jewish, begins a murder investigation. A riveting debut! www.paulgrossmanwriter.com


Schedule

  • 9:30 am - Ski or snowshoe with the authors at Grafton Ponds
    (call Grafton Ponds 843-2400 for prices)
  • 2:00-4:30 pm - Readings and discussion at Vermont Institute of Contemporary Arts (new venue)*
  • 4:30-5:30 pm - Reception and book signing at Vermont Institute of Contemporary Arts
  • 5:45-6:30 pm - Wine and Cheese reception in front of the fire at The Fullerton Inn (cash bar)
  • 6:30-8:00 pm - Dinner at the Fullerton Inn (reservations please 875-2444)

Note: All events are open to the public.

For more information , call Misty Valley Books at 802 875-3400. VTICA (www.vtica.org) is located at 15 Depot Street at the corner of Main Street and Depot Street (across from the Jiffy Mart)



SAVE THIS DATE

Sunday, December 11 from 2:00-4:00 PM Anna Dewdney returns to Misty Valley to sign her book, llama llama home with mama.

Warm and comforting, llama llama home with mama is just the right book for anyone who is feeling under the weather and needs a little cheering up.

Anna Dewdney will sign her book and maybe read while she's at Misty Valley! Holiday refreshments, too.

 


 

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